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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 139 pages of information about Utopia.

“It is hard to tell whether they are more dexterous in laying or avoiding ambushes.  They sometimes seem to fly when it is far from their thoughts; and when they intend to give ground, they do it so that it is very hard to find out their design.  If they see they are ill posted, or are like to be overpowered by numbers, they then either march off in the night with great silence, or by some stratagem delude their enemies.  If they retire in the day-time, they do it in such order that it is no less dangerous to fall upon them in a retreat than in a march.  They fortify their camps with a deep and large trench; and throw up the earth that is dug out of it for a wall; nor do they employ only their slaves in this, but the whole army works at it, except those that are then upon the guard; so that when so many hands are at work, a great line and a strong fortification is finished in so short a time that it is scarce credible.  Their armour is very strong for defence, and yet is not so heavy as to make them uneasy in their marches; they can even swim with it.  All that are trained up to war practise swimming.  Both horse and foot make great use of arrows, and are very expert.  They have no swords, but fight with a pole-axe that is both sharp and heavy, by which they thrust or strike down an enemy.  They are very good at finding out warlike machines, and disguise them so well that the enemy does not perceive them till he feels the use of them; so that he cannot prepare such a defence as would render them useless; the chief consideration had in the making them is that they may be easily carried and managed.

“If they agree to a truce, they observe it so religiously that no provocations will make them break it.  They never lay their enemies’ country waste nor burn their corn, and even in their marches they take all possible care that neither horse nor foot may tread it down, for they do not know but that they may have use for it themselves.  They hurt no man whom they find disarmed, unless he is a spy.  When a town is surrendered to them, they take it into their protection; and when they carry a place by storm they never plunder it, but put those only to the sword that oppose the rendering of it up, and make the rest of the garrison slaves, but for the other inhabitants, they do them no hurt; and if any of them had advised a surrender, they give them good rewards out of the estates of those that they condemn, and distribute the rest among their auxiliary troops, but they themselves take no share of the spoil.

“When a war is ended, they do not oblige their friends to reimburse their expenses; but they obtain them of the conquered, either in money, which they keep for the next occasion, or in lands, out of which a constant revenue is to be paid them; by many increases the revenue which they draw out from several countries on such occasions is now risen to above 700,000 ducats a year.  They send some of their own people to

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