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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 148 pages of information about A Record of Buddhistic kingdoms.
he divides the relic of the burnt body into two parts (for so evidently Fa-hien intended his narration to be taken), and leaves one half on each bank.  The account of Ananda’s death in Nien-ch’ang’s “History of Buddha and the Patriarchs” is much more extravagant.  Crowds of men and devas are brought together to witness it.  The body is divided into four parts.  One is conveyed to the Tushita heaven; a second, to the palace of a certain Naga king; a third is given to Ajatasatru; and the fourth to the Lichchhavis.  What it all really means I cannot tell.

CHAPTER XXVII

PATALIPUTTRA OR PATNA, IN MAGADHA.  KING ASOKA’S SPIRIT-BUILT PALACE AND HALLS.  THE BUDDHIST BRAHMAN, RADHA-SAMI.  DISPENSARIES AND HOSPITALS.

Having crossed the river, and descended south for a yojana, (the travellers) came to the town of Pataliputtra,(1) in the kingdom of Magadha, the city where king Asoka(2) ruled.  The royal palace and halls in the midst of the city, which exist now as of old, were all made by spirits which he employed, and which piled up the stones, reared the walls and gates, and executed the elegant carving and inlaid sculpture-work,—­in a way which no human hands of this world could accomplish.

King Asoka had a younger brother who had attained to be an Arhat, and resided on Gridhra-kuta(3) hill, finding his delight in solitude and quiet.  The king, who sincerely reverenced him, wished and begged him (to come and live) in his family, where he could supply all his wants.  The other, however, through his delight in the stillness of the mountain, was unwilling to accept the invitation, on which the king said to him, “Only accept my invitation, and I will make a hill for you inside the city.”  Accordingly, he provided the materials of a feast, called to him the spirits, and announced to them, “To-morrow you will all receive my invitation; but as there are no mats for you to sit on, let each one bring (his own seat).”  Next day the spirits came, each one bringing with him a great rock, (like) a wall, four or five paces square, (for a seat).  When their sitting was over, the king made them form a hill with the large stones piled on one another, and also at the foot of the hill, with five large square stones, to make an apartment, which might be more than thirty cubits long, twenty cubits wide, and more than ten cubits high.

In this city there had resided a great Brahman,(4) named Radha-sami,(5) a professor of the mahayana, of clear discernment and much wisdom, who understood everything, living by himself in spotless purity.  The king of the country honoured and reverenced him, and served him as his teacher.  If he went to inquire for and greet him, the king did not presume to sit down alongside of him; and if, in his love and reverence, he took hold of his hand, as soon as he let it go, the Brahman made haste to pour water on it and wash it.  He might be more than fifty years old, and all the kingdom looked up to him.  By means of this one man, the Law of Buddha was widely made known, and the followers of other doctrines did not find it in their power to persecute the body of monks in any way.

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