The Writings of Samuel Adams - Volume 4 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 336 pages of information about The Writings of Samuel Adams.

I am &c,

TO SAMUEL ALLYNE OTIS.

[Ms., Samuel Adams Papers, Lenox Library]

Philade Feby 10 1779

DEAR SIR

The late Mr Andrews before his sudden & unexpected Death had written to a young Kinsman of mine in this place, Mr Richard Checkley, proposing to him to go to Boston with a View of employing him in his Warehouse.  I know not whether Mr A intended to employ him in his own separate Affairs or in those in which he was joyntly concernd with you for the publick.  Mr C had not heard of his Death till he was just about setting off on his Journey to Boston when I informd him of it.  He is a young Man who, I am told, bears a good Character and is used to Business.  If you can employ him it will be doing him a singular Benefit and I shall acknowledge it as a great favor.  I ask it only on this Condition, that it may be perfectly consistent with your Views.  I am with Cordial Esteem, Sir

yr hble Servt

TO JAMES WARREN.

[Ms., Samuel Adams Papers, Lenox Library.]

Philade Feb 12 -79

MY DEAR SR

Will you be so kind as to present my due Regards to Mrs Warren and let her know that immediately on my receiving her Letter for Miss Wray I deliverd it to the Care of my worthy Friend Colo Laurens who has since informd me that he has forwarded it in his own Packet to South Carolina.

I have lately written several Letters to my Friend Dr C & have informd him that you & he & Mr S are my only confidential Correspondents in Boston.  I have other trusty Friends there, but I have not Leisure to write to them all.  I have expressd my wish that the honest & virtuous Friends of our Country would cultivate a cordial Esteem for each other.  I am affraid there are little Jealousies among them which prevent their uniting their Councils and Efforts against that Inundation of Levity Vanity Luxury Dissipation & indeed Vice of every kind which I am informd threatens that Country which has heretofore stood with unexampled Firmness in the Cause of Liberty and Virtue.  This Torrent must be stemmed, and in order to do it effectually, there must be Associations of Men of unshaken Fortitude.  A general Dissolution of Principles & Manners will more surely overthrow the Liberties of America than the whole Force of the Common Enemy.  While the People are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their Virtue they will be ready to surrender their Liberties to the first external or internal Invader.  How necessary then is it for those who are determind to transmit the Blessings of Liberty as a fair Inheritance to Posterity, to associate on publick Principles in Support of publick Virtue.  I do verily believe, and I may say it inter Nos, that the Principles & Manners of N Engd,

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The Writings of Samuel Adams - Volume 4 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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