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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 336 pages of information about The Writings of Samuel Adams.

And while we rejoice in the Blessing of Health bestowed upon us, we would sympathize with those of our Sister States, who are visited with a Contagious and Mortal Disease; and fervently supplicate the father of Mercies that they may speedily be restored to a state of Health and Prosperity.

That he would in his abundant Mercy regard our fellow Citizens and others, who are groaning under abject Slavery, in Algiers, and direct the most effectual measures for their speedy Relief.

That he would graciously be pleased to put an end to all Tyranny and Usurpation, that the People who are under the Yoke of Oppression, may be made free; and that the Nations who are contending for freedom may still be secured by his Almighty Aid, and enabled under His influence to complete wise systems of Civil Government, founded in the equal Rights of Men and calculated to establish their permanent Security and Welfare.

And Finally, that the Peaceful and Glorious Reign of our Divine Redeemer may be known and enjoyed throughout the whole Family of Mankind.

And I do recommend to the People of this Commonwealth, to abstain from all such Labour and Recreation, as may not be consistent with the Solemnity of the said Day.

Given at the Council-Chamber, in Boston, the fourteenth Day of October in the Year of our lord, One Thousand seven Hundred and Ninety-five, and in the Twentieth Year of the Independence of the United States of America.

Samuel Adams.

True Copy—­Attest,

John Avery, jun.  Sec’ry.

God save the Commonwealth of Massachusetts!

1796

TO THE LEGISLATURE OF MASSACHUSETTS.

January 19, 1796.

[Independent Chronicle, January 21, 1796, two texts are in the Massachusetts Archives.]

Fellow citizens,

I cannot but congratulate you upon the many blessings which the bountiful hand of Providence has bestowed upon us since your adjournment.

We with our Fellow Citizens at large have observed a day solemnly to recognize these blessings; and if sincere obedience to our gracious Benefactor, shall accompany the gratitude which we then professed, we may humbly rely upon him that he will continue his divine favors to the citizens at large, and direct the public councils of our Nation and Commonwealth to such measures as shall be productive of the safety and welfare of all.

In my former address to this General Court I mentioned the duty required by the Constitution, frequently to revise the laws, and amend such of them as may still be necessary to secure the lives, liberty and property of the citizens—­The importance of civil commutative justice and the good policy of making adequate compensations to those who administer well —­and the great advantages of cherishing the interests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them among the body of the people.  Upon these I shall not now enlarge.

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