The Way of All Flesh eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 579 pages of information about The Way of All Flesh.

Pryer was about twenty-eight years old.  He had been at Eton and at Oxford.  He was tall, and passed generally for good-looking; I only saw him once for about five minutes, and then thought him odious both in manners and appearance.  Perhaps it was because he caught me up in a way I did not like.  I had quoted Shakespeare for lack of something better to fill up a sentence—­and had said that one touch of nature made the whole world kin.  “Ah,” said Pryer, in a bold, brazen way which displeased me, “but one touch of the unnatural makes it more kindred still,” and he gave me a look as though he thought me an old bore and did not care two straws whether I was shocked or not.  Naturally enough, after this I did not like him.

This, however, is anticipating, for it was not till Ernest had been three or four months in London that I happened to meet his fellow-curate, and I must deal here rather with the effect he produced upon my godson than upon myself.  Besides being what was generally considered good-looking, he was faultless in his get-up, and altogether the kind of man whom Ernest was sure to be afraid of and yet be taken in by.  The style of his dress was very High Church, and his acquaintances were exclusively of the extreme High Church party, but he kept his views a good deal in the background in his rector’s presence, and that gentleman, though he looked askance on some of Pryer’s friends, had no such ground of complaint against him as to make him sever the connection.  Pryer, too, was popular in the pulpit, and, take him all round, it was probable that many worse curates would be found for one better.  When Pryer called on my hero, as soon as the two were alone together, he eyed him all over with a quick penetrating glance and seemed not dissatisfied with the result—­for I must say here that Ernest had improved in personal appearance under the more genial treatment he had received at Cambridge.  Pryer, in fact, approved of him sufficiently to treat him civilly, and Ernest was immediately won by anyone who did this.  It was not long before he discovered that the High Church party, and even Rome itself, had more to say for themselves than he had thought.  This was his first snipe-like change of flight.

Pryer introduced him to several of his friends.  They were all of them young clergymen, belonging as I have said to the highest of the High Church school, but Ernest was surprised to find how much they resembled other people when among themselves.  This was a shock to him; it was ere long a still greater one to find that certain thoughts which he had warred against as fatal to his soul, and which he had imagined he should lose once for all on ordination, were still as troublesome to him as they had been; he also saw plainly enough that the young gentlemen who formed the circle of Pryer’s friends were in much the same unhappy predicament as himself.

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The Way of All Flesh from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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