Uncle Tom's Cabin eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 531 pages of information about Uncle Tom's Cabin.

“And behold, the tears of such as were oppressed, and they had no comforter; and on the side of their oppressors there was power, but they had no comforter.”—­ECCL. 4:1

It took but a short time to familiarize Tom with all that was to be hoped or feared in his new way of life.  He was an expert and efficient workman in whatever he undertook; and was, both from habit and principle, prompt and faithful.  Quiet and peaceable in his disposition, he hoped, by unremitting diligence, to avert from himself at least a portion of the evils of his condition.  He saw enough of abuse and misery to make him sick and weary; but he determined to toil on, with religious patience, committing himself to Him that judgeth righteously, not without hope that some way of escape might yet be opened to him.

Legree took a silent note of Tom’s availability.  He rated him as a first-class hand; and yet he felt a secret dislike to him,—­the native antipathy of bad to good.  He saw, plainly, that when, as was often the case, his violence and brutality fell on the helpless, Tom took notice of it; for, so subtle is the atmosphere of opinion, that it will make itself felt, without words; and the opinion even of a slave may annoy a master.  Tom in various ways manifested a tenderness of feeling, a commiseration for his fellow-sufferers, strange and new to them, which was watched with a jealous eye by Legree.  He had purchased Tom with a view of eventually making him a sort of overseer, with whom he might, at times, intrust his affairs, in short absences; and, in his view, the first, second, and third requisite for that place, was hardness.  Legree made up his mind, that, as Tom was not hard to his hand, he would harden him forthwith; and some few weeks after Tom had been on the place, he determined to commence the process.

One morning, when the hands were mustered for the field, Tom noticed, with surprise, a new comer among them, whose appearance excited his attention.  It was a woman, tall and slenderly formed, with remarkably delicate hands and feet, and dressed in neat and respectable garments.  By the appearance of her face, she might have been between thirty-five and forty; and it was a face that, once seen, could never be forgotten,—­one of those that, at a glance, seem to convey to us an idea of a wild, painful, and romantic history.  Her forehead was high, and her eyebrows marked with beautiful clearness.  Her straight, well-formed nose, her finely-cut mouth, and the graceful contour of her head and neck, showed that she must once have been beautiful; but her face was deeply wrinkled with lines of pain, and of proud and bitter endurance.  Her complexion was sallow and unhealthy, her cheeks thin, her features sharp, and her whole form emaciated.  But her eye was the most remarkable feature,—­so large, so heavily black, overshadowed by long lashes of equal darkness, and so wildly, mournfully despairing.  There was a fierce pride and defiance in every line of her face, in every curve of the flexible lip, in every motion of her body; but in her eye was a deep, settled night of anguish,—­an expression so hopeless and unchanging as to contrast fearfully with the scorn and pride expressed by her whole demeanor.

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Uncle Tom's Cabin from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.