Uncle Tom's Cabin eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 531 pages of information about Uncle Tom's Cabin.

The dealers in the human article make scrupulous and systematic efforts to promote noisy mirth among them, as a means of drowning reflection, and rendering them insensible to their condition.  The whole object of the training to which the negro is put, from the time he is sold in the northern market till he arrives south, is systematically directed towards making him callous, unthinking, and brutal.  The slave-dealer collects his gang in Virginia or Kentucky, and drives them to some convenient, healthy place,—­often a watering place,—­to be fattened.  Here they are fed full daily; and, because some incline to pine, a fiddle is kept commonly going among them, and they are made to dance daily; and he who refuses to be merry—­in whose soul thoughts of wife, or child, or home, are too strong for him to be gay—­is marked as sullen and dangerous, and subjected to all the evils which the ill will of an utterly irresponsible and hardened man can inflict upon him.  Briskness, alertness, and cheerfulness of appearance, especially before observers, are constantly enforced upon them, both by the hope of thereby getting a good master, and the fear of all that the driver may bring upon them if they prove unsalable.

“What dat ar nigger doin here?” said Sambo, coming up to Tom, after Mr. Skeggs had left the room.  Sambo was a full black, of great size, very lively, voluble, and full of trick and grimace.

“What you doin here?” said Sambo, coming up to Tom, and poking him facetiously in the side.  “Meditatin’, eh?”

“I am to be sold at the auction, tomorrow!” said Tom, quietly.

“Sold at auction,—­haw! haw! boys, an’t this yer fun?  I wish’t I was gwine that ar way!—­tell ye, wouldn’t I make em laugh?  But how is it,—­dis yer whole lot gwine tomorrow?” said Sambo, laying his hand freely on Adolph’s shoulder.

“Please to let me alone!” said Adolph, fiercely, straightening himself up, with extreme disgust.

“Law, now, boys! dis yer’s one o’ yer white niggers,—­kind o’ cream color, ye know, scented!” said he, coming up to Adolph and snuffing.  “O Lor! he’d do for a tobaccer-shop; they could keep him to scent snuff!  Lor, he’d keep a whole shope agwine,—­he would!”

“I say, keep off, can’t you?” said Adolph, enraged.

“Lor, now, how touchy we is,—­we white niggers!  Look at us now!” and Sambo gave a ludicrous imitation of Adolph’s manner; “here’s de airs and graces.  We’s been in a good family, I specs.”

“Yes,” said Adolph; “I had a master that could have bought you all for old truck!”

“Laws, now, only think,” said Sambo, “the gentlemens that we is!”

“I belonged to the St. Clare family,” said Adolph, proudly.

“Lor, you did!  Be hanged if they ar’n’t lucky to get shet of ye.  Spects they’s gwine to trade ye off with a lot o’ cracked tea-pots and sich like!” said Sambo, with a provoking grin.

Adolph, enraged at this taunt, flew furiously at his adversary, swearing and striking on every side of him.  The rest laughed and shouted, and the uproar brought the keeper to the door.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Uncle Tom's Cabin from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.