Uncle Tom's Cabin eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 531 pages of information about Uncle Tom's Cabin.

“Well, since you must know all, it is so.  I have agreed to sell Tom and Harry both; and I don’t know why I am to be rated, as if I were a monster, for doing what every one does every day.”

“But why, of all others, choose these?” said Mrs. Shelby.  “Why sell them, of all on the place, if you must sell at all?”

“Because they will bring the highest sum of any,—­that’s why.  I could choose another, if you say so.  The fellow made me a high bid on Eliza, if that would suit you any better,” said Mr. Shelby.

“The wretch!” said Mrs. Shelby, vehemently.

“Well, I didn’t listen to it, a moment,—­out of regard to your feelings, I wouldn’t;—­so give me some credit.”

“My dear,” said Mrs. Shelby, recollecting herself, “forgive me.  I have been hasty.  I was surprised, and entirely unprepared for this;—­but surely you will allow me to intercede for these poor creatures.  Tom is a noble-hearted, faithful fellow, if he is black.  I do believe, Mr. Shelby, that if he were put to it, he would lay down his life for you.”

“I know it,—­I dare say;—­but what’s the use of all this?—­I can’t help myself.”

“Why not make a pecuniary sacrifice?  I’m willing to bear my part of the inconvenience.  O, Mr. Shelby, I have tried—­tried most faithfully, as a Christian woman should—­to do my duty to these poor, simple, dependent creatures.  I have cared for them, instructed them, watched over them, and know all their little cares and joys, for years; and how can I ever hold up my head again among them, if, for the sake of a little paltry gain, we sell such a faithful, excellent, confiding creature as poor Tom, and tear from him in a moment all we have taught him to love and value?  I have taught them the duties of the family, of parent and child, and husband and wife; and how can I bear to have this open acknowledgment that we care for no tie, no duty, no relation, however sacred, compared with money?  I have talked with Eliza about her boy—­her duty to him as a Christian mother, to watch over him, pray for him, and bring him up in a Christian way; and now what can I say, if you tear him away, and sell him, soul and body, to a profane, unprincipled man, just to save a little money?  I have told her that one soul is worth more than all the money in the world; and how will she believe me when she sees us turn round and sell her child?—­sell him, perhaps, to certain ruin of body and soul!”

“I’m sorry you feel so about it,—­indeed I am,” said Mr. Shelby; “and I respect your feelings, too, though I don’t pretend to share them to their full extent; but I tell you now, solemnly, it’s of no use—­I can’t help myself.  I didn’t mean to tell you this Emily; but, in plain words, there is no choice between selling these two and selling everything.  Either they must go, or all must.  Haley has come into possession of a mortgage, which, if I don’t clear off with him directly, will take everything before it.  I’ve raked, and scraped, and borrowed, and all but begged,—­and the price of these two was needed to make up the balance, and I had to give them up.  Haley fancied the child; he agreed to settle the matter that way, and no other.  I was in his power, and had to do it.  If you feel so to have them sold, would it be any better to have all sold?”

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Uncle Tom's Cabin from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.