Uncle Tom's Cabin eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 531 pages of information about Uncle Tom's Cabin.

And Tom did pray, with all his mind and strength, for the soul that was passing,—­the soul that seemed looking so steadily and mournfully from those large, melancholy blue eyes.  It was literally prayer offered with strong crying and tears.

When Tom ceased to speak, St. Clare reached out and took his hand, looking earnestly at him, but saying nothing.  He closed his eyes, but still retained his hold; for, in the gates of eternity, the black hand and the white hold each other with an equal clasp.  He murmured softly to himself, at broken intervals,

“Recordare Jesu pie—­ * * * * Ne me perdas—­illa die Querens me—­sedisti lassus.”

It was evident that the words he had been singing that evening were passing through his mind,—­words of entreaty addressed to Infinite Pity.  His lips moved at intervals, as parts of the hymn fell brokenly from them.

“His mind is wandering,” said the doctor.

“No! it is coming HOME, at last!” said St. Clare, energetically; “at last! at last!”

The effort of speaking exhausted him.  The sinking paleness of death fell on him; but with it there fell, as if shed from the wings of some pitying spirit, a beautiful expression of peace, like that of a wearied child who sleeps.

So he lay for a few moments.  They saw that the mighty hand was on him.  Just before the spirit parted, he opened his eyes, with a sudden light, as of joy and recognition, and said "Mother!" and then he was gone!

CHAPTER XXIX

The Unprotected

We hear often of the distress of the negro servants, on the loss of a kind master; and with good reason, for no creature on God’s earth is left more utterly unprotected and desolate than the slave in these circumstances.

The child who has lost a father has still the protection of friends, and of the law; he is something, and can do something,—­has acknowledged rights and position; the slave has none.  The law regards him, in every respect, as devoid of rights as a bale of merchandise.  The only possible acknowledgment of any of the longings and wants of a human and immortal creature, which are given to him, comes to him through the sovereign and irresponsible will of his master; and when that master is stricken down, nothing remains.

The number of those men who know how to use wholly irresponsible power humanely and generously is small.  Everybody knows this, and the slave knows it best of all; so that he feels that there are ten chances of his finding an abusive and tyrannical master, to one of his finding a considerate and kind one.  Therefore is it that the wail over a kind master is loud and long, as well it may be.

When St. Clare breathed his last, terror and consternation took hold of all his household.  He had been stricken down so in a moment, in the flower and strength of his youth!  Every room and gallery of the house resounded with sobs and shrieks of despair.

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Uncle Tom's Cabin from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.