Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 531 pages of information about Uncle Tom's Cabin.

With Adolph the case had been different.  Thoughtless and self-indulgent, and unrestrained by a master who found it easier to indulge than to regulate, he had fallen into an absolute confusion as to meum tuum with regard to himself and his master, which sometimes troubled even St. Clare.  His own good sense taught him that such a training of his servants was unjust and dangerous.  A sort of chronic remorse went with him everywhere, although not strong enough to make any decided change in his course; and this very remorse reacted again into indulgence.  He passed lightly over the most serious faults, because he told himself that, if he had done his part, his dependents had not fallen into them.

Tom regarded his gay, airy, handsome young master with an odd mixture of fealty, reverence, and fatherly solicitude.  That he never read the Bible; never went to church; that he jested and made free with any and every thing that came in the way of his wit; that he spent his Sunday evenings at the opera or theatre; that he went to wine parties, and clubs, and suppers, oftener than was at all expedient,—­were all things that Tom could see as plainly as anybody, and on which he based a conviction that “Mas’r wasn’t a Christian;”—­a conviction, however, which he would have been very slow to express to any one else, but on which he founded many prayers, in his own simple fashion, when he was by himself in his little dormitory.  Not that Tom had not his own way of speaking his mind occasionally, with something of the tact often observable in his class; as, for example, the very day after the Sabbath we have described, St. Clare was invited out to a convivial party of choice spirits, and was helped home, between one and two o’clock at night, in a condition when the physical had decidedly attained the upper hand of the intellectual.  Tom and Adolph assisted to get him composed for the night, the latter in high spirits, evidently regarding the matter as a good joke, and laughing heartily at the rusticity of Tom’s horror, who really was simple enough to lie awake most of the rest of the night, praying for his young master.

“Well, Tom, what are you waiting for?” said St. Clare, the next day, as he sat in his library, in dressing-gown and slippers.  St. Clare had just been entrusting Tom with some money, and various commissions.  “Isn’t all right there, Tom?” he added, as Tom still stood waiting.

“I’m ’fraid not, Mas’r,” said Tom, with a grave face.

St. Clare laid down his paper, and set down his coffee-cup, and looked at Tom.

“Why Tom, what’s the case?  You look as solemn as a coffin.”

“I feel very bad, Mas’r.  I allays have thought that Mas’r would be good to everybody.”

“Well, Tom, haven’t I been?  Come, now, what do you want?  There’s something you haven’t got, I suppose, and this is the preface.”

“Mas’r allays been good to me.  I haven’t nothing to complain of on that head.  But there is one that Mas’r isn’t good to.”

Follow Us on Facebook