Tales of Troy: Ulysses, the sacker of cities eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 105 pages of information about Tales of Troy.
fickle, cruel, selfish, and set very bad examples to men.  How far these stories were believed is not sure; it is certain that “all men felt a need of the Gods,” and thought that they were pleased by good actions and displeased by evil.  Yet, when a man felt that his behaviour had been bad, he often threw the blame on the Gods, and said that they had misled him, which really meant no more than that “he could not help it.”

There was a curious custom by which the princes bought wives from the fathers of the princesses, giving cattle and gold, and bronze and iron, but sometimes a prince got a wife as the reward for some very brave action.  A man would not give his daughter to a wooer whom she did not love, even if he offered the highest price, at least this must have been the general rule, for husbands and wives were very fond of each other, and of their children, and husbands always allowed their wives to rule the house, and give their advice on everything.  It was thought a very wicked thing for a woman to like another man better than her husband, and there were few such wives, but among them was the most beautiful woman who ever lived.

THE WOOING OF HELEN OF THE FAIR HANDS

This was the way in which people lived when Ulysses was young, and wished to be married.  The worst thing in the way of life was that the greatest and most beautiful princesses might be taken prisoners, and carried off as slaves to the towns of the men who had killed their fathers and husbands.  Now at that time one lady was far the fairest in the world:  namely, Helen, daughter of King Tyndarus.  Every young prince heard of her and desired to marry her; so her father invited them all to his palace, and entertained them, and found out what they would give.  Among the rest Ulysses went, but his father had a little kingdom, a rough island, with others near it, and Ulysses had not a good chance.  He was not tall; though very strong and active, he was a short man with broad shoulders, but his face was handsome, and, like all the princes, he wore long yellow hair, clustering like a hyacinth flower.  His manner was rather hesitating, and he seemed to speak very slowly at first, though afterwards his words came freely.  He was good at everything a man can do; he could plough, and build houses, and make ships, and he was the best archer in Greece, except one, and could bend the great bow of a dead king, Eurytus, which no other man could string.  But he had no horses, and had no great train of followers; and, in short, neither Helen nor her father thought of choosing Ulysses for her husband out of so many tall, handsome young princes, glittering with gold ornaments.  Still, Helen was very kind to Ulysses, and there was great friendship between them, which was fortunate for her in the end.

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Tales of Troy: Ulysses, the sacker of cities from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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