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Rafael Sabatini
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 337 pages of information about Captain Blood.

At noon on the morrow, shorn of defences and threatened with bombardment, Cartagena sent offers of surrender to M. de Rivarol.

Swollen with pride by a victory for which he took the entire credit to himself, the Baron dictated his terms.  He demanded that all public effects and office accounts be delivered up; that the merchants surrender all moneys and goods held by them for their correspondents; the inhabitants could choose whether they would remain in the city or depart; but those who went must first deliver up all their property, and those who elected to remain must surrender half, and become the subjects of France; religious houses and churches should be spared, but they must render accounts of all moneys and valuables in their possession.

Cartagena agreed, having no choice in the matter, and on the next day, which was the 5th of April, M. de Rivarol entered the city and proclaimed it now a French colony, appointing M. de Cussy its Governor.  Thereafter he proceeded to the Cathedral, where very properly a Te Deum was sung in honour of the conquest.  This by way of grace, whereafter M. de Rivarol proceeded to devour the city.  The only detail in which the French conquest of Cartagena differed from an ordinary buccaneering raid was that under the severest penalties no soldier was to enter the house of any inhabitant.  But this apparent respect for the persons and property of the conquered was based in reality upon M. de Rivarol’s anxiety lest a doubloon should be abstracted from all the wealth that was pouring into the treasury opened by the Baron in the name of the King of France.  Once the golden stream had ceased, he removed all restrictions and left the city in prey to his men, who proceeded further to pillage it of that part of their property which the inhabitants who became French subjects had been assured should remain inviolate.  The plunder was enormous.  In the course of four days over a hundred mules laden with gold went out of the city and down to the boats waiting at the beach to convey the treasure aboard the ships.

CHAPTER XXVIII

THE HONOUR OF M. DE RIVAROL

During the capitulation and for some time after, Captain Blood and the greater portion of his buccaneers had been at their post on the heights of Nuestra Senora de la Poupa, utterly in ignorance of what was taking place.  Blood, although the man chiefly, if not solely, responsible for the swift reduction of the city, which was proving a veritable treasure-house, was not even shown the consideration of being called to the council of officers which with M. de Rivarol determined the terms of the capitulation.

This was a slight that at another time Captain Blood would not have borne for a moment.  But at present, in his odd frame of mind, and its divorcement from piracy, he was content to smile his utter contempt of the French General.  Not so, however, his captains, and still less his men.  Resentment smouldered amongst them for a while, to flame out violently at the end of that week in Cartagena.  It was only by undertaking to voice their grievance to the Baron that their captain was able for the moment to pacify them.  That done, he went at once in quest of M. de Rivarol.

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