Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 243 pages of information about Penguin Island.

At that party Eveline had been much noticed and had attracted the special attention of a young diplomat called Roger Lambilly who, imagining that she belonged to a rather fast set, invited her to his bachelor’s flat.  She thought him handsome and believed him rich, and she accepted.  A little moved, almost disquieted, she very nearly became the victim of her daring, and only avoided defeat by an offensive measure audaciously carried out.  This was the most foolish escapade in her unmarried life.

Being now on friendly terms with Ministers and with the President, Eveline continued to wear her aristocratic and pious affectations, and these won for her the sympathy of the chief personages in the anti-clerical and democratic Republic.  M. Hippolyte Ceres, seeing that she was succeeding and doing him credit, liked her still more.  He even went so far as to fall madly in love with her.

Henceforth, in spite of everything, she began to observe him with interest, being curious to see if his passion would increase.  He appeared to her without elegance or grace, and not well bred, but active, clear-sighted, full of resource, and not too great a bore.  She still made fun of him, but he had now won her interest.

One day she wished to test him.  It was during the elections, when members of Parliament were, as the phrase runs, requesting a renewal of their mandates.  He had an opponent, who, though not dangerous at first and not much of an orator, was rich and was reported to be gaining votes every day.  Hippolyte Ceres, banishing both dull security and foolish alarm from his mind, redoubled his care.  His chief method of action was by public meetings at which he spoke vehemently against the rival candidate.  His committee held huge meetings on Saturday evenings and at three o’clock on Sunday afternoons.  One Sunday, as he called on the Clarences, he found Eveline alone in the drawing-room.  He had been chatting for about twenty or twenty-five minutes, when, taking out his watch, he saw that it was a quarter to three.  The young girl showed herself amiable, engaging, attractive, and full of promises.  Ceres was fascinated, but he stood up to go.

“Stay a little longer,” said she in a pressing and agreeable voice which made him promptly sit down again.

She was full of interest, of abandon, curiosity, and weakness.  He blushed, turned pale, and again got up.

Then, in order to keep him still longer, she looked at him out of two grey and melting eyes, and though her bosom was heaving, she did not say another word.  He fell at her feet in distraction, but once more looking at his watch, he jumped up with a terrible oath.

“D—! a quarter to four!  I must be off.”

And immediately he rushed down the stairs.

From that time onwards she had a certain amount of esteem for him.

IV.  A POLITICIAN’S MARRIAGE

Follow Us on Facebook