Fifty Famous Stories Retold eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 96 pages of information about Fifty Famous Stories Retold.

They tried to whip him, but that only made him worse.  At last the king bade his servants take him away.

“It is a pity to ruin so fine a horse as that,” said Al-ex-an’der, the king’s young son.  “Those men do not know how to treat him.”

“Perhaps you can do better than they,” said his father scorn-ful-ly.

“I know,” said Al-ex-an-der, “that, if you would only give me leave to try, I could manage this horse better than any one else.”

“And if you fail to do so, what then?” asked Philip.

“I will pay you the price of the horse,” said the lad.

While everybody was laughing, Alexander ran up to Bu-ceph-a-lus, and turned his head toward the sun.  He had noticed that the horse was afraid of his own shadow.

He then spoke gently to the horse, and patted him with his hand.  When he had qui-et-ed him a little, he made a quick spring, and leaped upon the horse’s back.

Everybody expected to see the boy killed outright.  But he kept his place, and let the horse run as fast as he would.  By and by, when Bucephalus had become tired, Alexander reined him in, and rode back to the place where his father was standing.

All the men who were there shouted when they saw that the boy had proved himself to be the master of the horse.

He leaped to the ground, and his father ran and kissed him.

“My son,” said the king, “Macedon is too small a place for you.  You must seek a larger kingdom that will be worthy of you.”

After that, Alexander and Bucephalus were the best of friends.  They were said to be always together, for when one of them was seen, the other was sure to be not far away.  But the horse would never allow any one to mount him but his master.

Alexander became the most famous king and warrior that was ever known; and for that reason he is always called Alexander the Great.  Bucephalus carried him through many countries and in many fierce battles, and more than once did he save his master’s life.

DIOGENES THE WISE MAN.

At Cor-inth, in Greece, there lived a very wise man whose name was Di-og’e-nes.  Men came from all parts of the land to see him and hear him talk.

But wise as he was, he had some very queer ways.  He did not believe that any man ought to have more things than he re-al-ly needed; and he said that no man needed much.  And so he did not live in a house, but slept in a tub or barrel, which he rolled about from place to place.  He spent his days sitting in the sun, and saying wise things to those who were around him.

At noon one day, Di-og-e-nes was seen walking through the streets with a lighted lantern, and looking all around as if in search of something.

“Why do you carry a lantern when the sun is shining?” some one said.

“I am looking for an honest man,” answered Diogenes.

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Fifty Famous Stories Retold from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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