The Feast at Solhoug eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 50 pages of information about The Feast at Solhoug.

With rings, and with jewels, and all of my best
By his order myself I am decking—­
But oh, if to-day were my burial-feast,
’Twere little that I’d be recking.
     [Breaking off.

But if thus I brood I must needs despair;
I know a song that can lighten care.
     [She sings.

The Hill-King to the sea did ride;
   —­Oh, sad are my days and dreary—­
To woo a maiden to be his bride. 
   —­I am waiting for thee, I am weary.—­

The Hill-King rode to Sir Hakon’s hold;
   —­Oh, sad are my days and dreary—­
Little Kirsten sat combing her locks of gold. 
   —­I am waiting for thee, I am weary.—­

The Hill-King wedded the maiden fair;
   —­Oh, sad are my days and dreary—­
A silvern girdle she ever must wear. 
   —­I am waiting for thee, I am weary.—­

The Hill-King wedded the lily-wand,
   —­Oh, sad are my days and dreary—­
With fifteen gold rings on either hand. 
   —­I am waiting for thee, I am weary.—­

Three summers passed, and there passed full five;
   —­Oh, sad are my days and dreary—­
In the hill little Kirsten was buried alive. 
   —­I am waiting for thee, I am weary.—­

Five summers passed, and there passed full nine;
   —­Oh, sad are my days and dreary—­
Little Kirsten ne’er saw the glad sunshine. 
   —­I am waiting for thee, I am weary.—­

In the dale there are flowers and the birds’ blithe song;
   —­Oh, sad are my days and dreary—­
In the hill there is gold and the night is long. 
   —­I am waiting for thee, I am weary.—­
     [She rises and crosses the room.

How oft in the gloaming would Gudmund sing
This song in may father’s hall. 
There was somewhat in it—­some strange, sad thing
That took my heart in thrall;
Though I scarce understood, I could ne’er forget—­
And the words and the thoughts they haunt me yet.
     [Stops horror-struck.

Rings of red gold!  And a belt beside—! 
’Twas with gold the Hill-King wedded his bride!
     [In despair; sinks down on a bench beside the table on
       the left.

Woe!  Woe!  I myself am the Hill-King’s wife! 
And there cometh none to free me from the prison of my life.

     [SIGNE, radiant with gladness, comes running in from
       the back.

SIGNE.

  [Calling.] Margit, Margit,—­he is coming!

MARGIT.

  [Starting up.] Coming?  Who is coming?

SIGNE.

  Gudmund, our kinsman!

MARGIT.

  Gudmund Alfson!  Here!  How can you think—?

SIGNE.

  Oh, I am sure of it.

MARGIT.

[Crosses to the right.] Gudmund Alfson is at the wedding-feast in the King’s hall; you know that as well as I.

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Project Gutenberg
The Feast at Solhoug from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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