Manhood Perfectly Restored eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 86 pages of information about Manhood Perfectly Restored.
which is easily absorbed by the clothes, and rapidly dries up, because it has become thin, watery and effete.  In addition to this loss he is subject to one equally great on almost every occasion of +urinating+ and +defecating+.  This also takes place without any consciousness on his part, and his only knowledge of the fact is from the alarming weakness he experiences after passing water or going to stool.  Distraction or absence of mind renders the judgment unfit for any extensive enterprise.

The sexual powers are greatly weakened; the overtaxed organs refuse to fulfill their legitimate task; their susceptibility and irritability are so great that the power of retention is lost, and the seminal fluid is discharged prematurely.

The generative organs are wasted and inactive, or so weakened as to secrete but a ropy, thin and glairy fluid, having few or none of the characteristics of Vital Fluid.  Should the individual suffering this way—­and either careless or unfortunate enough to go uncured—­have offspring, they will assuredly be puny in body and weakly in mind, and will lead a miserable existence through the neglect and indiscretion of their parent.

THIRD STAGE.—­STAGNATION AND WASTING.

This stage is an aggravation of the two preceding stages combined.

The emissions are accompanied and followed by a disagreeable and disgusting sensation of shame and misery.  The mind is absorbed as much as can be by the one idea of its wretched situation, and the sufferer is haunted by the thought that his condition and its cause are known to the whole world, and that he is pitied or scorned by every person he meets.  He is hypochondriacal, and fearful suggestions of self-destruction ever and anon present themselves.

The power of mental concentration is entirely gone and the memory is so feeble that the patient continually forgets what he begins to say.  The dimness of vision is continual and so great as to be a material annoyance; the eyes are wandering or fixed upon the ground, seldom venturing to meet the gaze of another.  The +ringing in the ears+, +pains in the head and over the eyes+ are almost perpetual and frequently accompanied by partial deafness. +The heart is the seat of pain+, +fluttering+ and +throbbing+ with +violent and long-continued palpitation+, his hands shake, his limbs tremble, his knees are weak, so much so that at times it is almost impossible for him to walk erect.  He experiences an insatiable desire for sleep, and yet upon retiring he lies awake for hours, tormented by his troubled reflections, and at last falls into an uneasy slumber, of short duration, disturbed by wretched dreams.

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Manhood Perfectly Restored from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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