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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 455 pages of information about The Delight Makers.

F. W. Hodge.

Smithsonian institution,
Washington, D. C.,
September 25, 1916.

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NOTE

A special interest attaches to the illustrations, now first included in this edition.  Many of them are from photographs made by Chas. F. Lummis in 1890, under the supervision of Bandelier, and with special reference to “The Delight Makers,” then being written.  These two friends were the first students to explore the Tyuonyi and its neighborhood.  In rain and shine, afoot, without blankets or overcoats, with no more provision than a little atole (popcorn meal) and sweet chocolate, they climbed the cliffs, threaded the canons, slept in caves or under trees, measured, mapped and photographed the ruins and landscapes with a 40-pound camera, and laid the basis-notes for part of Bandelier’s monumental “Final Report” to the Archaeological Institute of America.

A few later photographs from the same hand show part of the excavation done in the Tyuonyi by the School of American Archaeology—­through whose loving and grateful efforts this canon has been set apart as a National Monument bearing the name of its discoverer and chronicler,

AdolfF. Bandelier.

Thanks are due also to Hon. Frederick C. Hicks, M.C., for six very interesting photographs of the Zunis and their country.

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IN MEMORY

One day of August, 1888, in the teeth of a particular New Mexico sand-storm that whipped pebbles the size of a bean straight to your face, a ruddy, bronzed, middle-aged man, dusty but unweary with his sixty-mile tramp from Zuni, walked into my solitary camp at Los Alamitos.  Within the afternoon I knew that here was the most extraordinary mind I had met.  There and then began the uncommon friendship which lasted till his death, a quarter of a century later; and a love and admiration which will be of my dearest memories so long as I shall live.  I was at first suspicious of the “pigeon-hole memory” which could not only tell me some Queres word I was searching for, but add:  “Policarpio explained that to me in Cochiti, November 23, 1881.”  But I discovered that this classified memory was an integral part of this extraordinary genius.  The acid tests of life-long collaboration proved not only this but the judicial poise, the marvelous insight and the intellectual chastity of Bandelier’s mind.  I cannot conceive of anything in the world which would have made him trim his sails as a historian or a student for any advantage here or hereafter.

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