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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 138 pages of information about The Adventures of Akbar.

Next came Trooper Faithful on his old white charger Lightning.  Once upon a time it had been like its name, swift exceedingly, but now, like its master, it was slow and stiff.

Then followed Head-nurse, astride, in Indian fashion, the bay Belooch mare which had been Queen Humeeda’s favourite mount until it had had to be left behind in one of the hasty moves which had of late been so common in the hunted life of the Royal Fugitives.  The mare, of course, had been taken by the pursuers, and brought along with them; and the groom in charge of it had come grinning with delight to Foster-father when he found himself in the same camp again.  Foster-father was for riding the bay mare himself and giving sober Horse-chestnut to the Heir-to-Empire, but Head-nurse would not hear of this.  The bay mare was, she said, altogether more royal.  So there she was, with Baby Akbar astride a cushion in front, perched on the skittish creature, feeling at heart very nervous, for she was but a poor rider.  However, she held on very tight with one hand, held Baby Akbar still tighter with the other, and trusted to Providence, while Roy and Meroo ran beside her on either side, alternately holding up the Royal Umbrella as best they could.

Foster-mother on a mule, with little Adam perched in front of her brought up the rear of the procession.  It was a poor one for progress even along the levels, because of the bay mare’s fidgeting and caperings, but when the steep hill sides were reached it became impossible to keep up with the rest of the equipage.  So Prince Askurry and his men pushed on ahead leaving the little party alone, since escape was impossible on that wild mountain road, especially with the rear guard of the camp coming a few miles behind them.  And, indeed, if such an idea had entered the heads of any of the party it must soon have fled before the difficulty of getting along at all.  It was a steep zig-zag path, and looking upwards you could see it zigging and zagging right away to the sky line.  Poor Foster-mother, who came last, could not take her eyes off it, for the bends immediately above her were filled with the most terrifying sights.  First her stout husband, who seemed to be in the act of slipping over Horse-chestnut’s tail.  On the next Old Faithful, driven to dismounting and laboriously lugging Lightning up by the bridle.  But the last zig-zag in front of her called forth piercing shrieks.  For the bay mare, not having been ridden for some time, was full of beans.  Baby Akbar insisted on holding the reins, and Meroo, whose turn it was to hold the umbrella, would slip and slither among the stones, thereby bringing its fringe right on the bay mare’s nose.

“Oh!  Head-nurse, have a care!  The blessed child!” shrieked poor Foster-mother as a more than usually bad stumble sent the umbrella on to the mare’s tail.

This was too much for it.  Frightened out of its senses, it gave a frenzied bound forwards, then rearing straight up, hung over the edge of the path, as if it meant to take a downward plunge.

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