Latin for Beginners eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 299 pages of information about Latin for Beginners.
studeo:  stude:re studui:  be eager
CONJUGATION III
ago:            agere          e:gi:            drive
cre:do:          cre:dere        cre:didi:        believe
fugio:          fugere         fu:gi:           flee
iacio:          iacere         ie:ci:           hurl
interficio:     interficere    interfe:ci:      kill
rapio:          rapere         rapui:          seize
resis’to:       resis’tere     re’stiti:       resist

  CONJUGATION IV
    repe’rio:  reperi:’re rep’peri:  find

    [Footnote 2:  These are all verbs that you have had before, and the
    perfect is the only new form to be learned.]

200. PERSEUS AND ANDROMEDA (Concluded)

First learn the special vocabulary, p. 290.  Read the whole story.

Perseus semper proelio studebat[3] et respondit,[3] “Verba tua sunt maxime grata,” et laetus arma sua magica paravit.[3] Subito monstrum videtur; celeriter per aquam properat et Andromedae adpropinquat.  Eius amici longe absunt et misera puella est sola.  Perseus autem sine mora super aquam volavit.[3] Subito descendit[3] et duro gladio saevum monstrum graviter vulneravit.[3] Diu pugnatur,[4] diu proelium est dubium.  Denique autem Perseus monstrum interfecit[3] et victoriam reportavit.[3] Tum ad saxum venit[3] et Andromedam liberavit[3] et eam ad Cepheum duxit.[3] Is, nuper miser, nunc laetus, ita dixit[3]:  “Tuo auxilio, mi amice, cara filia mea est libera; tua est Andromeda.”  Diu Perseus cum Andromeda ibi habitabat[3] et magnopere a toto populo amabatur.[3]

    [Footnote 3:  See if you can explain the use of the perfects and
    imperfects in this passage.]

[Footnote 4:  The verb pugnatur means, literally, it is fought; translate freely, the battle is fought, or the contest rages.  The verb pugno in Latin is intransitive, and so does not have a personal subject in the passive.  A verb with an indeterminate subject, designated in English by it, is called impersonal.]

LESSON XXXV

THE PASSIVE PERFECTS OF THE INDICATIVE
THE PERFECT PASSIVE AND FUTURE ACTIVE INFINITIVE

201. The fourth and last of the principal parts (Sec. 183) is the perfect passive participle\. _From it we get the participial stem on which are formed the future active infinitive and all the passive perfects._

1.  Learn the following principal parts, which are for the first time
given in full: 

CONJ.  PRES.  INDIC.  PRES.  INFIN.  PERF.  INDIC.  PERF.  PASS.  PART. 
I. amo:  ama:’-re ama:’v-i:  ama:’t-us
This is the model for all regular verbs of the first conjugation. 
II. mo’neo:  mone:’-re mo’nu-i:  mo’nit-us
III. rego:  re’ge-re re:x-i:  re:ct-us
ca’pio:  ca’pe-re ce:p-i:  capt-us
IV. au’dio:  audi:’-re audi:’v-i:  audi:’t-us

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Latin for Beginners from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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