The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. - Volume 07 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 345 pages of information about The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D..
the utmost industry.  The chief-justice sent them back nine times, and kept them eleven hours, until, being perfectly tired out, they were forced to leave the matter to the mercy of the judge, by what they call a special verdict.  During the trial, the chief-justice, among other singularities, laid his hand on his breast, and protested solemnly that the author’s design was to bring in the Pretender, although there was not a single syllable of party in the whole treatise; and although it was known that the most eminent of those who professed his own principles, publicly disallowed his proceedings.  But the cause being so very odious and unpopular, the trial of the verdict was deferred from one term to another, until, upon the Duke of Grafton’s, the lord lieutenant’s arrival, his grace, after mature advice, and permission from England, was pleased to grant a noli prosequi.”

     This Chief Justice Whitshed was the same who acted as judge on
     Harding’s trial for printing the fourth Drapier letter.  Swift never
     forgot him, and took several occasions to satirize him bitterly.

* * * * *

     The text of the present edition is based on the Dublin edition of
     1720 and collated with the texts of Faulkner, 1735, and
     Miscellanies of same date.

     [T.  S.]

A

PROPOSAL

For the universal Use

Of Irish Manufacture,

IN

Cloaths and Furniture of Houses, &c.

UTTERLY

Rejecting and Renouncing

Every Thing wearable that comes from

ENGLAND.

* * * * *

Dublin:  Printed and Sold by E.  Waters, in Essex-street, at the Corner of Sycamore-Alley, 1720.

A PROPOSAL FOR THE UNIVERSAL USE OF IRISH MANUFACTURE, IN CLOTHES
AND FURNITURE OF HOUSES, &c.

UTTERLY REJECTING AND RENOUNCING EVERY THING WEARABLE THAT COMES FROM
ENGLAND.

It is the peculiar felicity and prudence of the people in this kingdom, that whatever commodities or productions lie under the greatest discouragements from England, those are what we are sure to be most industrious in cultivating and spreading.  Agriculture, which hath been the principal care of all wise nations, and for the encouragement whereof there are so many statute laws in England, we countenance so well, that the landlords are everywhere by penal clauses absolutely prohibiting their tenants from ploughing; not satisfied to confine them within certain limitations, as it is the practice of the English; one effect of which is already seen in the prodigious dearness of corn, and the importation of it from London, as the cheaper market:[6] And because people are the riches of a country, and that our neighbours have done, and are doing all that in them lie, to make our wool a drug to us, and a monopoly to them; therefore the politic gentlemen of Ireland have depopulated vast tracts of the best land, for the feeding of sheep.[7]

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