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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 345 pages of information about The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D..
Lady” which follows “The Story,” Swift takes it upon himself to give her proper advice for her future conduct towards her lover.  In this advice he reiterates what he has always been saying to the people of Ireland, but formulates it in the language affected by the lady herself.  He tells her that she should look to it that her “family and tenants have no dependence upon the said gentleman farther than by the old agreement [the Act of Henry VII], which obliges you to have the same steward, and to regulate your household by such methods as you should both agree to”; that she shall be free to carry her goods to any market she pleases; that she shall compel the servants to whom she pays wages to remain at home; and that if she make an agreement with a tenant, it shall not be in his power to break it.  If she will only show a proper spirit, he assures her that there are gentlemen who would be glad of an occasion to support her in her resentment.

* * * * *

     The text of both the tracts here given is based on that of the
     earliest edition I could find, namely, that of 1746, collated with
     that given by Faulkner.

     [T.  S.]

THE

STORY

OF THE

INJURED LADY.

Being a true PICTURE of SCOTCH Perfidy, IRISH
Poverty, and ENGLISH Partiality.

WITH

LETTERS and POEMS

Never before Printed.

* * * * *

By the Rev. Dr. SWIFT, D. S. P. D.

* * * * *

LONDON,

Printed for M. COOPER, at the Globe in

Pater-Noster-Row.  MDCCXLVI.

[Price One Shilling.]

SIR,

Being ruined by the inconstancy and unkindness of a lover, I hope, a true and plain relation of my misfortunes may be of use and warning to credulous maids, never to put too much trust in deceitful men.

A gentleman[58] in the neighbourhood had two mistresses, another and myself;[59] and he pretended honourable love to us both.  Our three houses stood pretty near one another; his was parted from mine by a river,[60] and from my rival’s by an old broken wall.[61] But before I enter into the particulars of this gentleman’s hard usage of me, I will give a very just impartial character of my rival and myself.

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