The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. - Volume 07 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 345 pages of information about The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D..

I could have wished, as I am a private man, that, in the instrument of my freedom, you had pleased to assign your reasons for making choice of me.  I know it is a usual compliment to bestow the freedom of the city on an archbishop, or lord-chancellor, and other persons of great titles, merely on account of their stations or power:  but a private man, and a perfect stranger, without power or grandeur, may justly expect to find the motives assigned in the instrument of his freedom, on what account he is thus distinguished.  And yet I cannot discover, in the whole parchment scrip, any one reason offered.  Next, as to the silver box, there is not so much as my name upon it, nor any one syllable to show it was a present from your city.  Therefore I have, by the advice of friends, agreeable with my opinion, sent back the box and instrument of freedom by Mr. Faulkner, to be returned to you; leaving to your choice whether to insert the reasons for which you were pleased to give me my freedom, or bestow the box upon some more worthy person whom you may have an intention to honour, because it will equally fit everybody.

I am, with true esteem and gratitude,
Gentlemen,
Your most obedient and obliged servant,
JON.  SWIFT.

TO THE HONOURABLE THE SOCIETY OF THE GOVERNOR AND ASSISTANTS, LONDON,

FOR THE NEW PLANTATION IN ULSTER, WITHIN THE REALM OF IRELAND, AT THE CHAMBER IN GUILDHALL, LONDON.

         &nb
sp;                                          April 19, 1739. 
 WORTHY GENTLEMEN,

I heartily recommend to your very Worshipful Society, the Reverend Mr. William Dunkin,[199] for the living of Colrane, vacant by the death of Dr. Squire.  Mr. Dunkin is a gentleman of great learning and wit, true religion, and excellent morals.  It is only for these qualifications that I recommend him to your patronage; and I am confident that you will never repent the choice of such a man, who will be ready at any time to obey your commands.  You have my best wishes, and all my endeavours for your prosperity:  and I shall, during my life, continue to be, with the truest respect and highest esteem,

Worthy Sirs,
Your most obedient, and most humble servant,
JON.  SWIFT.

CERTIFICATE TO A DISCARDED SERVANT.

Deanery-house,
Jan. 9, 1739-40

Whereas the bearer served me the space of one year, during which time he was an idler and a drunkard, I then discharged him as such; but how far his having been five years at sea may have mended his manners, I leave to the penetration of those who may hereafter choose to employ him.

JON.  SWIFT.

AN EXHORTATION ADDRESSED TO THE
SUB-DEAN AND CHAPTER OF ST.
PATRICK’S CATHEDRAL, DUBLIN.

January 28, 1741.

Whereas my infirmities of age and ill-health have prevented me to preside in the chapters held for the good order and government of my cathedral church of St. Patrick, Dublin, in person:  I have, by a legal commission, made and appointed the very reverend Doctor John Wynne, praecentor of the said cathedral, to be sub-dean in my stead and absence.  I do hereby ratify and confirm all the powers delegated to the said Dr. Wynne in the said Commission.

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The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. - Volume 07 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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