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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 520 pages of information about The Last Man.

I revolved again and again all that I remembered my mother to have told me of my father’s former life; I contemplated the few relics I possessed belonging to him, which spoke of greater refinement than could be found among the mountain cottages; but nothing in all this served as a guide to lead me to another and pleasanter way of life.  My father had been connected with nobles, but all I knew of such connection was subsequent neglect.  The name of the king,—­he to whom my dying father had addressed his latest prayers, and who had barbarously slighted them, was associated only with the ideas of unkindness, injustice, and consequent resentment.  I was born for something greater than I was—­and greater I would become; but greatness, at least to my distorted perceptions, was no necessary associate of goodness, and my wild thoughts were unchecked by moral considerations when they rioted in dreams of distinction.  Thus I stood upon a pinnacle, a sea of evil rolled at my feet; I was about to precipitate myself into it, and rush like a torrent over all obstructions to the object of my wishes—­ when a stranger influence came over the current of my fortunes, and changed their boisterous course to what was in comparison like the gentle meanderings of a meadow-encircling streamlet.

CHAPTER II.

I lived far from the busy haunts of men, and the rumour of wars or political changes came worn to a mere sound, to our mountain abodes.  England had been the scene of momentous struggles, during my early boyhood.  In the year 2073, the last of its kings, the ancient friend of my father, had abdicated in compliance with the gentle force of the remonstrances of his subjects, and a republic was instituted.  Large estates were secured to the dethroned monarch and his family; he received the title of Earl of Windsor, and Windsor Castle, an ancient royalty, with its wide demesnes were a part of his allotted wealth.  He died soon after, leaving two children, a son and a daughter.

The ex-queen, a princess of the house of Austria, had long impelled her husband to withstand the necessity of the times.  She was haughty and fearless; she cherished a love of power, and a bitter contempt for him who had despoiled himself of a kingdom.  For her children’s sake alone she consented to remain, shorn of regality, a member of the English republic.  When she became a widow, she turned all her thoughts to the educating her son Adrian, second Earl of Windsor, so as to accomplish her ambitious ends; and with his mother’s milk he imbibed, and was intended to grow up in the steady purpose of re-acquiring his lost crown.  Adrian was now fifteen years of age.  He was addicted to study, and imbued beyond his years with learning and talent:  report said that he had already begun to thwart his mother’s views, and to entertain republican principles.  However this might be, the haughty Countess entrusted none with the secrets of her family-tuition.  Adrian

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