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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 262 pages of information about The Path of Duty, and Other Stories.

“It’s too bad,” exclaimed Harry Knights, as he turned from the window, where for the last ten minutes he had been silently watching the heavy drops of rain as they pattered against the glass.  “It’s too bad,” repeated he, “we can have no out-of-door play this afternoon;” and as he spoke his face wore a most rueful expression.  I was one among a number of Harry’s schoolmates who had gone to spend the day at the farm of Mr. Knights, Harry’s father.  The eldest of our number was not more than fourteen; and for a long time we had looked forward to this day with many bright anticipations of fun and enjoyment.  The important day at length arrived, and so early did we set out upon our excursion that we reached Harry’s home before eight o’clock in the morning.  We spent the forenoon in rambling over the farm, searching out every nook and corner which possessed any interest to our boyish minds.  Accompanied by Harry we visited all his favorite haunts—­which included a fine stream of water, where there was an abundance of fish; also a ledge of rocks which contained a curious sort of cave, formed by a wide aperture in the rocks; and, last though “not least,” a pond of water which, owing to its extreme beauty of appearance, Harry had named the “Enchanted Pond.”  He had said so much to us regarding the uncommon beauty of the spot that some of the boys, myself among the number, had often been inclined to ridicule him; but when we came within view of it, I for one ceased to wonder at his admiration; for before nor since, I never looked upon so lovely a scene.  The pond was situated upon the back portion of the farm, in a clearing which had been made by a settler who had occupied the land for some years before it was purchased by Mr. Knights.  The form of the pond was entirely circular, and it was surrounded by a green field, in which had been left standing, here and there, some fine old trees to add to the effect.  I remember when I first gained a view of the spot, it reminded me of a surface of polished silver, bordered with emeralds.  As we drew nigh we could see that its smooth waters were thickly dotted with the pure blossoms of the pond-lily.  I have never since visited the spot, but the view I obtained of it that day, now so long ago, is still vividly present to my mind.  By the time we again reached the farm-house, the dinner-hour had arrived; and our long continued exercise in the open air had so much improved our appetites that we did ample justice to the good things set before us.  Dinner being over, we observed, what had before escaped our notice, that the sky was becoming overcast with dark clouds, and soon a heavy rain began to fall, which put an end to all our plans of out-of-door enjoyment for the afternoon.  As I mentioned at the beginning, Harry was very much disappointed, for outside sports were his especial delight; and for a time his face looked almost as dark and forbidding as the sky itself.  We tried to cheer him up, saying we would have some quiet games

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