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Patriotic Plays and Pageants for Young People eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 108 pages of information about Patriotic Plays and Pageants for Young People.

If “The Younger Sons of Freedom” cannot obtain suits of the colors described, let them wear the usual boys’ coats with Colonial pockets basted on, and let them have full knee-breeches, such as those of gymnasium suits.  For older boys who play the parts, black evening suits, the coats shaped and basted back to resemble Colonial coats.  White lace stocks and cravats, and lace wrist ruffles, and jabots.

DRAMATIC SILHOUETTE:  THE SPIRIT OF ’76

Thrown into shadow silhouette by a strong light placed behind a white curtain, the figures of the young patriots appear.  Music of fife and drum in orchestra, clear, high, blood-stirring.  First a small drummer-boy passes, with a cocked hat, and poised drum-sticks.  Then a boy of the same age carrying a musket that is much too large for him.  Then two taller patriot lads, very soldier-like.  Then a country boy with a hoe over his shoulder.  Then two figures, one playing a fife, the other a drum.  Then a lone patriot lad with a cocked hat and musket.  Then another drummer-boy.  Then a boy with a flag, and a half dozen patriots following him.  The music grows fainter and fainter, as if with the tread of marching feet.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN:  RAIL SPLITTER

CHARACTERS

ABRAHAM LINCOLN
NANCY LINCOLN
TOM BUSH
AMY ROBY
POLLY PRENTICE
JASON BROWN
LUCY BROWN FRANCOIS DURAND
LITTLE JOHN LINCOLN
NOCTAH, an Indian

SCENE:  The Lincoln kitchen and living-room.  Place:  Little Pigeon Creek,
Indiana.  Time, 1823.

The room is bright and clean, showing both thrift and poverty.  There are two windows in background, with well-mended, faded curtains of the cheapest cotton.  Between these two windows a stout door, which gives on the outside road.  On the door is tacked a raccoon skin.

By the window at right a plain pine table and chair.  The end of the table is set with a plate, knife, fork, drinking-cup, etc., for one person, and there are corndodgers in generous quantities, and a jug of molasses.

In the middle of the right wall there is a wide-mouthed fireplace, with black andirons, several iron pots, and a skillet.  Above the hearth strips of leather nailed to the wall serve as holders for empty powder-horns, knives, etc.  There is a pine bench by the hearth, placed so that those sitting on it face the audience.  Also a three-legged pine stool.  Beyond the hearth, towards the background, a dresser with a few dishes.

Fastened to the wall, left foreground, is a pine shelf on which stand Abraham Lincoln’s books, well-worn copies of “Robinson Crusoe” “Aesop’s Fables,” “Pilgrim’s Progress,” etc., etc.  Above this shelf a clock, battered yet adequate.  A bearskin rug on the floor.  The whole scene is homely, peaceful, intimate.

The embers on the hearth give out a dull glow which leaves the room in semi-darkness, yet lights up several objects by the hearthstone—­ namely, a heap of pine cones, some dried spice-wood bushes, a rude corn-popper, a snow-shovel, and a neatly-mended tongs.

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