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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 108 pages of information about Patriotic Plays and Pageants for Young People.

PRISCILLA. 
She means we should accept it.  Is that not truly generous!

DIANTHA (reassured).  It must be Star-of-Spring, the little Indian maid of whom Squanto has so often told us.

[Diantha takes up basket.  Pantomime of delight on part of Star-of-Spring.  She draws near to Anne, and with a quaint grace touches Anne’s cap and kerchief.  Tries on Anne’s cap, and looks at herself in a barbaric bit of looking-glass that dangles from one of her many chains of beads.  Then laughs, gives back the cap, and is in turn fascinated at the sight of Priscilla when she begins spinning.  Star-of-Spring approaches the wheel with pantomime indicating awe and delighted curiosity.  She first inspects it, and then begins to talk in dumbshow with quick, animated gestures.  The Pilgrim maidens are somewhat bewildered.

DIANTHA (as the meaning of the scene dawns on her).  Priscilla!  She wishes to spin!

ANNE.  Thou hast done many strange things in this new land, Priscilla; but I doubt not that the strangest of all is to give an Indian maiden her first lesson in spinning!

[Priscilla rises.  Star-of-Spring seats herself.  Business of Priscilla’s teaching her to spin.  Haltingly and somewhat fumblingly she does at length manage to compass the first rudiments of her lesson.  The Pilgrim maidens stand grouped about her.  Tableau.  DEGORY (from background).  The shadows of the pines lengthen across your door-sill, Priscilla!

[At sound of the new voice Star-of-Spring rises, and hastily retreats, right.  Degory Martin and John Billington enter from background.

DIANTHA.  Only think, Degory, Star-of-Spring, an Indian maid, hath had a spinning lesson!

DEGORY. 
The shadows are lengthening.  Twilight comes apace here in the forest. 
’Tis time you all came home.

[The maidens of Plymouth follow him as he and John Billington take the spinning-wheel and spinning-stool with them.  They make their exit at center background.  Star-of-Spring, who has lingered at edge of trees, right, steals out to look after her departing playmates.  Stands at place where spinning-wheel was.  Again shakes her head, as if in perplexity over the strange arts of the palefaces.  Finds on grass part of a skein of flax.  Tosses it lightly in the air.  Catches it again as it falls.  Begins a characteristic dance, swaying, tossing skein, catching it.  Each step of the dance takes her further into background.  Then she comes down center again, like a tossing bough or a blown flame.  She does not perceive the group entering from left.  Her mother (Natiqua), Forest Flower, and Heron’s Wing.  They also are so occupied with portage that they do not perceive Star-of-Spring until they are almost up to her.  Heron’s Wing and Forest Flower carry between them a birch-bark canoe.  Behind them trudges Natiqua, bent beneath a double pile of fagots.  They pass, in picturesque silhouette, back of the spot where Priscilla had been seated with her spinning-wheel. 

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