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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 163 pages of information about Lady Rosamond's Secret.
for such pure and fervent love, no matter at what cost or sacrifice, gladly would the conscientious principles of Lady Rosamond accept the terms.  Her marked concern and unremitting attention failed not to elicit admiration from the Premier, who, despite his stern, disciplined nature, had not forgotten to pay tribute to the attractions of a beautiful woman.  The Iron Duke indeed showed a decided preference for her ladyship.  He was charmed with the sweet, unassuming, and childlike manner of the young matron, and took delight in contrasting these with the glaring and ostentatious demeanor of these high-minded and profound women with whom he daily mingled.

Lady Rosamond repaid the gallant Duke for such attention.  She loved to engage him in earnest and animated conversation, and watch the fire that kindled the soul within by the light emitted from the deep flashing eye.  She felt a deep interest in the stern old warrior from the endearing associations which his memory had woven around her.  While in Fredericton her ladyship had heard many stories in which her friends had also figured in close relation to the hero of a hundred fights.  Sir Howard Douglas had oftentimes entertained his family circle with a recital of such scenes.  The friend of Sir Howard, Colonel Trevelyan, was also an actor in the great drama.  But the last personage could not possibly cause any tender interest to the mind of Lady Rosamond.

Gerald Bereford was opposed in principle to the present administration.  He formed one of the strongest leaders of the opposition.  His heart was in the work before him; he would not flinch from the responsibility.  His haggard countenance often gave evidence of the spirit which influenced his actions; yet he wearied not.  A mild reproof from his lovely wife would for the while have some effect, when he would devote all his leisure to her comfort and pastime, being fully repaid by the most simple caress or quiet smile.

Early in the next year an event followed which had a great effect both on political and social life.  His Majesty, George the Fourth, had passed away from earth.  Among those within our acquaintance few there were who deeply regretted the circumstance.

Lady Rosamond, in writing a friend, said:  “We cannot indeed entertain any lasting regrets for one who inflicted such misery upon one of our sex.  The unfortunate queen and her tragical end inspires me with a feeling bordering upon hate towards the author.  As women we must feel it, but as women we must forgive.”

Thus was the matter viewed by her ladyship, who now looked forward with happy anticipation to the approaching and brilliant pageantry.  The “Sailor King” sat peacefully on the throne of England.  In the days of her childhood Lady Rosamond loved to climb upon the knee of a handsome nobleman—­in truth a gallant prince.  Lovingly did she nestle against his manly breast with eager, childish confidence, throwing her beautiful silken ringlets over his shoulders

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