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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 183 pages of information about War and the future.

THE PASSING OF THE EFFIGY

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One of the minor peculiarities of this unprecedented war is the Tour of the Front.  After some months of suppressed information—­in which even the war correspondent was discouraged to the point of elimination—­it was discovered on both sides that this was a struggle in which Opinion was playing a larger and more important part than it had ever done before.  This wild spreading weed was perhaps of decisive importance; the Germans at any rate were attempting to make it a cultivated flower.  There was Opinion flowering away at home, feeding rankly on rumour; Opinion in neutral countries; Opinion getting into great tangles of misunderstanding and incorrect valuation between the Allies.  The confidence and courage of the enemy; the amiability and assistance of the neutral; the zeal, sacrifice, and serenity of the home population; all were affected.  The German cultivation of opinion began long before the war; it is still the most systematic and, because of the psychological ineptitude of the Germans, it is probably the clumsiest.  The French Maison de la Presse is certainly the best organisation in existence for making things clear, counteracting hostile suggestion, the British official organisations are comparatively ineffective; but what is lacking officially is very largely made up for by the good will and generous efforts of the English and American press.  An interesting monograph might be written upon these various attempts of the belligerents to get themselves and their proceedings explained.

Because there is perceptible in these developments, quite over and above the desire to influence opinion, a very real effort to get things explained.  It is the most interesting and curious—­one might almost write touching—­feature of these organisations that they do not constitute a positive and defined propaganda such as the Germans maintain.  The German propaganda is simple, because its ends are simple; assertions of the moral elevation and loveliness of Germany; of the insuperable excellences of German Kultur, the Kaiser, and Crown Prince, and so forth; abuse of the “treacherous” English who allied themselves with the “degenerate” French and the “barbaric” Russians; nonsense about “the freedom of the seas”—­the emptiest phrase in history—­childish attempts to sow suspicion between the Allies, and still more childish attempts to induce neutrals and simple-minded pacifists of allied nationality to save the face of Germany by initiating peace negotiations.  But apart from their steady record and reminder of German brutalities and German aggression, the press organisations of the Allies have none of this definiteness in their task.  The aim of the national intelligence in each of the allied countries is not to exalt one’s own nation and confuse and divide the enemy, but to get a real understanding with the peoples and spirits of a number of different nations, an understanding

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