Sagittulae, Random Verses eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 66 pages of information about Sagittulae, Random Verses.
claims of man. 
  With new honours Alma Mater shall eternally be crowned,
  When the Ladies march in triumph, and her learned
      seat surround;
  Then a nobler race of students, and of athletes
      shall arise,
  Students fair who thirst for knowledge, athletes
      true who ‘pots’ despise. 
  It is well for thee, sweet Clio, at their harmless
      tastes to sneer,
  At their love of cats and croquet, their antipathy
      to beer;
  But as soon as every College has surrendered to the fair,
  Life up here will be perfection, we shall breathe
      ambrosial air;
  For the problem of past ages will be solved, and
      we shall find
  The superior powers of woman, both in body and in mind. 
  She shall teach us how to study, how to ride,
      and run, and row;
  How to box and play at cricket; how the heavy
      weight to throw;
  How to shoot the trembling pigeon; how the wily rat
      to slay;
  How at football and at racquets; how at whist and
      chess to play;
  How to drive the rapid tandem; how to jump, and how
      to walk;
  (For young women, trust me, Clio, can do something
      more than talk)
  How to climb the Alps in summer; how in winter time
      to skate;
  How to hold the deadly rifle; how a yacht to navigate;
  How to make the winning hazard with an effort sure
      and strong;
  How to play the maddening comet, how to sing a comic song;
  How to ‘utilize’ Professors; how to purify the Cam;
  How to brew a sherry cobbler, and to make red-currant jam. 
  All the arts which now we practise in a desultory way
  Shall be taught us to perfection, when we own the
      Ladies’ sway.” 
  Thus I spake, and strove by speaking to assuage
      sweet Clio’s fears;
  But she shook her head in sorrow, and departed drowned
      in tears.

  (1874).

[1] Mr. J. B. Close, a well-known oarsman, stroke of the First Trinity 1st Boat.

[*] [Transcriber’s note:  The word “psychroloutes” appears in the original book in Greek.  It has been transliterated from the Greek letters psi, upsilon, chi, rho, omicron, lambda, omicron, upsilon, tau, eta, and sigma.]

ATHLETES AND AESTHESIS.

  An Idyll of the Cam.

  It was an Undergraduate, his years were scarce nineteen;
  Discretion’s years and wisdom’s teeth he plainly ne’er had seen;
  For his step was light and jaunty, and around him wide and far
  He puffed the fragrant odours of a casual cigar.

  It was a sweet girl-graduate, her years were thirty two;
  Her brow was intellectual, her whole appearance blue;
  Her dress was mediaeval, and, as if by way of charm,
  Six volumes strapped together she was bearing ’neath her arm.

  ‘My beautiful Aesthesis,’ the young man rashly cried,
  ’I am the young Athletes, of Trinity the pride;
  I have large estates in Ireland, which ere long
      will pay me rent;
  I have rooms in Piccadilly, and a farm (unlet) in Kent.

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