The Hand Of Fu-Manchu eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 190 pages of information about The Hand Of Fu-Manchu.

Being a New Phase in the Activities of Fu-Manchu, the Devil Doctor

by

SAX ROHMER

THE HAND OF FU MANCHU

CHAPTER I

THE TRAVELER FROM TIBET

“Who’s there?” I called sharply.

I turned and looked across the room.  The window had been widely opened when I entered, and a faint fog haze hung in the apartment, seeming to veil the light of the shaded lamp.  I watched the closed door intently, expecting every moment to see the knob turn.  But nothing happened.

“Who’s there?” I cried again, and, crossing the room, I threw open the door.

The long corridor without, lighted only by one inhospitable lamp at a remote end, showed choked and yellowed with this same fog so characteristic of London in November.  But nothing moved to right nor left of me.  The New Louvre Hotel was in some respects yet incomplete, and the long passage in which I stood, despite its marble facings, had no air of comfort or good cheer; palatial it was, but inhospitable.

I returned to the room, reclosing the door behind me, then for some five minutes or more I stood listening for a repetition of that mysterious sound, as of something that both dragged and tapped, which already had arrested my attention.  My vigilance went unrewarded.  I had closed the window to exclude the yellow mist, but subconsciously I was aware of its encircling presence, walling me in, and now I found myself in such a silence as I had known in deserts but could scarce have deemed possible in fog-bound London, in the heart of the world’s metropolis, with the traffic of the Strand below me upon one side and the restless life of the river upon the other.

It was easy to conclude that I had been mistaken, that my nervous system was somewhat overwrought as a result of my hurried return from Cairo—­from Cairo where I had left behind me many a fondly cherished hope.  I addressed myself again to the task of unpacking my steamer-trunk and was so engaged when again a sound in the corridor outside brought me upright with a jerk.

A quick footstep approached the door, and there came a muffled rapping upon the panel.

This time I asked no question, but leapt across the room and threw the door open.  Nayland Smith stood before me, muffled up in a heavy traveling coat, and with his hat pulled down over his brows.

“At last!” I cried, as my friend stepped in and quickly reclosed the door.

Smith threw his hat upon the settee, stripped off the great-coat, and pulling out his pipe began to load it in feverish haste.

“Well,” I said, standing amid the litter cast out from the trunk, and watching him eagerly, “what’s afoot?”

Nayland Smith lighted his pipe, carelessly dropping the match-end upon the floor at his feet.

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The Hand Of Fu-Manchu from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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