Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 290 pages of information about The Mafulu.
upper parts Loloipa), flowing from the north, and the river Aduala, flowing from Mt.  Albert Edward in the north-east; and this arrangement, which is practically in accord with a map appended to the British New Guinea Annual Report for June, 1900, is, I think, probably the most suitable and correct one.  The Aduala is the river the upper part of which is in the Geographical Society’s map called Angabunga.  The Fathers’ map shows the river Kea flowing into the Aduala at a distance of about two miles above the confluence of the latter with the Alabula; but, according to the Report map, this distance is about 12 miles.

[3] Note the change from the Mafulu (Papuan) pronunciation Mambule to the Kuni (Melanesian) pronunciation Mafulu and the similar change from the Mafulu Ambo to the Kuni Ajoa.

[4] See Dr. Seligmann’s “Hunterian Lecture” in the Lancet for February 17, 1906, p. 427; Seligmann and Strong in the Geographical Journal for March, 1906, pp. 233 and 236; also Dr. Seligmann’s “Classification of the Natives of British New Guinea” in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute for December, 1909, p. 329.

[5] Melanesians of British New Guinea, p. 29.

[6] Ibid. p. 31.

[7] Lancet, February 17, 1906, p. 427.

[8] Geographical Journal for September, 1908, p. 274.

[9] Melanesians of British New Guinea, p. 32.

[10] British New Guinea Annual Report for June, 1906, p. 29.

[11] British New Guinea Annual Report for June 30, 1906, pp. 85 to 93.

[12] Melanesians of British New Guinea, p. 33.

[13] Apparently bows and arrows are not found among the tribes of the Lower Mambare river (Annual Report for June, 1897, Appendix C, p. 7.)

[14] Annual Report for June, 1894, p. 32.

[15] Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute for December, 1909, p. 329.

[16] Annual Report for June, 1897, Appendix C, p. 7.

[17] Geographical Journal for October, 1900, p. 422.

[18] Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute for December, 1909, p. 330.

[19] British New Guinea, p. 94.

[20] Melanesians of British New Guinea, p. 32.

[21] Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute for December, 1909, p. 329.

[22] Seligmann and Strong—­Geographical Journal for March, 1906, p. 232.

[23] Seligmann’s Melanesians of British New Guinea, p. 27.

[24] Dr. Strong has referred (Geographical Journal for September, 1908, p. 272) to the considerable areas of open grass country at the source of the St. Joseph river; and in his remarks which appeared in the Annual Report for June, 1906, p. 28, he referred to the same matter, and spoke of the valleys being for the most part less steep than those of the Kuni district.

Follow Us on Facebook