Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 290 pages of information about The Mafulu.

(2) Is a short note on the Afoa language prepared by Dr. W. M. Strong, when he was Government Agent in Mekeo, and handed by him to Dr. Seligmann for publication.  To this note Mr. Ray has added a footnote.

(3) Is a note on the Kovio language prepared by Dr. Strong, and handed by him to Dr. Seligmann.  This note refers to the languages spoken in the neighbourhoods of Inavarene and the Inava valley and of the Upper Lakekamu river, all of which were found by Dr. Strong to be somewhat similar.  The footnote is by Mr. Ray.

(4) Is a comparative vocabulary, prepared by Mr. Ray, of the languages of some of the different Papuan-speaking people of the mountain districts of Central British New Guinea.  The words in the “Mafulu” column are taken from a very lengthy MS. vocabulary compiled by Father Egedi in Mafulu.  Those in the “Kambisa” column were all collected by the Rev. P. J. Money in the Kambisa villages of the Upper Chirima valley during Mr. Monckton’s expedition, referred to in my introductory chapter.  Most of these words are taken from the New Guinea Annual Report for 1905-6; but to them have been added other words, which had been collected by Mr. Money.  The words in the “Korona” column are taken from an MS. vocabulary prepared by Dr. Strong at Korona, also mentioned in my introductory chapter, and handed by him to Dr. Seligmann.  Those in the “Afoa” column are taken from an MS. vocabulary prepared by Dr. Strong in connection with his Afoa notes, to which are added in square brackets some other words taken from Father Egedi’s vocabulary in Anthropos II., 1907, pp. 1016-1021, this vocabulary being there called by him Tauata.  The words in the “Kovio” column are taken from an MS. vocabulary prepared by Dr. Strong in connection with his Kovio notes, to which are added in square brackets some “Oru-Lopiku” words collected by Father Egedi, and published in Anthropos II., 1907, pp. 1016-1021.  As regards this column I must explain that Dr. Strong’s words were all collected within the districts to which his notes refer, but that Father Egedi’s words, though in part collected there, were, I believe, in part collected further to the east.

(5) Is a series of notes by Mr. Ray upon the matter contained in the previous appendices.

I am perhaps open to criticism for introducing into a book of my own notes on the Mafulu people such extensive material written by others, and relating to other mountain districts as well as to that of the Mafulu; but my belief as to the probable similarity in many respects between the Papuan-speaking natives of these central mountain districts, and the obvious value and importance of the matter which has been so kindly placed at my disposal, justify me, I think, in introducing it; and indeed I should be doing but ill service to New Guinea ethnology if I did not take advantage of these opportunities which have been offered to me.

Though I am not qualified to discuss these materials from the grammatical and scientific linguistic point of view, there are a few matters to which I should like to draw attention, as affecting statements appearing in this book, and which were written by me before I received this linguistic material.

Follow Us on Facebook