Gifts of Genius eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 144 pages of information about Gifts of Genius.

(FROM THE GERMAN OF MOHRIKE.)

    A light skiff swam on Danube’s tide,
    Where sat a bridegroom and his bride,
      He this side and she that side.

    Quoth she, “Heart’s dearest, tell to me,
    What wedding-gift shall I give thee?”

    Upward her little sleeve she strips,
    And in the water briskly dips.

    The young man did the same straightway,
    And played with her and laughed so gay.

    “Ah, give to me, Dame Danube fair,
    Some pretty toy for my love to wear!”

    She drew therefrom a shining blade,
    For which the youth so long had prayed.

    The bridegroom, what holds he in hand? 
    Of milk-white pearls a precious band.

    He twines it round her raven hair;
    She looked how like a princess there!

    “Oh, give to me, Dame Danube fair,
    Some pretty toy for my love to wear!”

    A second time her arm dips in,
    A glittering helm of steel to win.

    The youth, o’erjoyed the prize to view,
    Brings her a golden comb thereto.

    A third time she in the water dips. 
    Ah woe! from out the skiff she slips.

    He leaps for her and grasps straightway—­
    Dame Danube tears them both away.

    The dame began her gifts to rue—­
    The youth must die, the maiden too!

    The little skiff floats down alone,
    Behind the hills soon sinks the sun.

    And when the moon was overhead,
    To land the lovers floated dead,
      He this side and she that side!

II.

THE FISHER-MAIDEN.

(FROM THE GERMAN OF HEINE.)

    Thou handsome fisher-maiden,
      Push thy canoe to land;
    Come and sit down beside me—­
      We’ll talk, love, hand in hand.

    Thy head lay on my bosom,
      Be not afraid of me,
    For careless thou confidest
      Each day in the wild sea.

    My heart is like the ocean,
      Has storm, and ebb, and flow;
    And many pearls so handsome
      Rest in its deeps below.

III.

MY CHILD WHEN WE WERE CHILDREN.

(FROM THE GERMAN OF HEINE.)

    My child when we were children,
      Two children small and gay,
    We crept into the hen-house
      And hid us under the hay.

    We crowed, as do the cockerels,
      When people passed the road,
    “Kikeriki!” and they fancied
      It was the cock that crowed.

    The chests which lay in the court-yard,
      We papered them so fair,
    Making a house right famous,
      And dwelt together there.

    The old cat of our neighbor,
      Came oft to make a call;
    We made her bows and courtesies,
      And compliments and all.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Gifts of Genius from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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