Illusions eBook

James Sully
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 304 pages of information about Illusions.

  Temperature, sense of, 65.

  Tennyson, A., 226.

  Testa, A.J., 131.

  Testimony, of consciousness, 205;
    fallacies of, 265;
    to identity, 267.

  Thaumatrope, 56.

  Theatre, illusion of the, 104, 222;
    self-deception of the actor, 200.

  Thompson, Professor S.P., 51, note[17].

  Thought, in relation to belief, 326.

  Time, retrospective idea of, 239, 246, 250;
    constant error in estimate of, 245;
    subjective estimate of, 249;
    contemporaneous estimate of, 250;
    sense of, in insanity, 290;
    prospective estimate of, 303.

  Touch, as form of perception, 33, 34, 49;
    local discrimination in, 52;
    subjective sensations of, 62;
    variations in sensibility of, 65;
    in sleep, 141.

  Transformation, in perception, 94;
    of images in dreams, 163;
    in memory, 262, 267;
    in expectation, 305.

  Trick. See Conjuror.

  Tuke, Dr., 110.

  Tylor, E.B., 128, note[69].

  U.

  Unconscious, inference, 22, 68, 269, 335, note[150];
    mental activity, 133, 235;
    impressions, 41, 152.

  Useful. See Beneficial.

  V.

  Vanity. See Self-esteem.

  Venn, J., 299, note[139].

  Ventriloquism, 82.

  Verification, of sense-impression, 38, 351;
    of self-inspection, 210;
    of memory, 291.

  Verisimilitude, in art, 80, 88;
    in theatrical representation, 104;
    in dreams, 168.

  Vierordt, 245.

  Vision. See Sight.

  Visions, 1, 110;
    dreams regarded as, 128, 131.

  Vital sense. See Coenaesthesis.

  Voice, internal, 119, 194;
    activity of, in dreams, 155.

  Volition, and perception, 95;
    absence of, during sleep, 137,172;
    co-operation of, in correction, of illusion, 352.

  Volkelt, J., 172.

  W.

  Weber, E.H., 43.

  Weinhold, Professor, 186.

  Wetness, perception of, 53.

  Wheatstone, Sir C, 75.

  Wheel of life, 56.

  Will. See Volition.

  Wordsworth, W., 281.

  World, our estimate of, 323, 326, 327;
    scientific conception of material, 8, 36, 343, 344;
    reality of external, 344-346, 349, 353, 355, 360.

  Wundt, Professor, W. 13, note[2], 31, note[11], 32, note[12], 58,
    note[27], 67, note[34], 75, 93, note[47], 118, note[63], 136,
    note[77], 139, 143, 177, 246, 247, note[119], 251, 252, 254.

THE END

FOOTNOTES: 

[1] A history of the distinction is given by Brierre de Boismont, in his work On Illusions (translated by R. T. Hulme, 1859).  He says that Arnold (1806) first defined hallucination, and distinguished it from illusion.  Esquirol, in his work, Des Maladies Mentales (1838), may be said to have fixed the distinction. (See Hunt’s translation, 1845, p. 111.)

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Illusions from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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