Our Deportment eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 348 pages of information about Our Deportment.

TWO GENTLEMEN WALKING WITH A LADY.

When two gentlemen are walking with a lady in the street they should not be both upon the same side of her, but one of them should walk upon the outside and the other upon the inside.

CROSSING THE STREET WITH A LADY.

If a gentleman is walking with a lady who has his arm, and they cross the street, it is better not to disengage the arm, and go round upon the outside.  Such effort evinces a palpable attention to form, and that is always to be avoided.

FULFILLING AN ENGAGEMENT.

When on your way to fill an engagement, if a friend stops you on the street you may, without committing a breach of etiquette, tell him of your appointment, and release yourself from any delay that may be occasioned by a long talk; but do so in a courteous manner, expressing regret for the necessity.

WALKING WITH A LADY ACQUAINTANCE.

A gentleman should not join a lady acquaintance on the street for the purpose of walking with her, unless he ascertains that his company would be perfectly agreeable to her.  It might be otherwise, and she should frankly say so, if asked.

PASSING BEFORE A LADY.

When a lady wishes to enter a store, house or room, if a gentleman accompanies her, he should hold the door open and allow her to enter first, if practicable; for a gentleman must never pass before a lady anywhere if he can avoid it, or without an apology.

SHOPPING ETIQUETTE.

In inquiring for goods at a store or shop, do not say to the clerk or salesman, “I want” such an article, but, “Please show me” such an article, or some other polite form of address.

You should never take hold of a piece of goods or an article which another person is examining.  Wait until it is replaced upon the counter, when you are at liberty to examine it.

It is rude to interrupt friends whom you meet in a store before they have finished making their purchases, or to ask their attention to your own purchases.  It is rude to offer your opinion unasked, upon their judgment or taste, in the selection of goods.

It is rude to sneer at and depreciate goods, and exceedingly discourteous to the salesman.  Use no deceit, but be honest with them, if you wish them to be honest with you.

Avoid “jewing down” the prices of articles in any way.  If the price does not suit, you may say so quietly, and depart, but it is generally best to say nothing about it.

It is an insult for the salesman to offensively suggest that you can do better elsewhere, which should be resented by instant departure.

Ladies should not monopolize the time and attention of salesmen in small talk, while other customers are in the store to be waited upon.

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Our Deportment from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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