Our Deportment eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 348 pages of information about Our Deportment.

LADY AND GENTLEMAN WALKING TOGETHER.

A gentleman walking with a lady should treat her with the most scrupulous politeness, and may take either side of the walk.  It is customary for the gentleman to have the lady on his right hand side, and he offers her his right arm, when walking arm in arm.  If, however, the street is crowded, the gentleman must keep the lady on that side of him where she will be the least exposed to crowding.

OFFERING THE ARM TO A LADY.

A gentleman should, in the evening, or whenever her safety, comfort or convenience seems to require it, offer a lady companion his arm.  At other times it is not customary to do so unless the parties be husband and wife or engaged.  In the latter case, it is not always advisable to do so, as they may be made the subject of unjust remarks.

KEEPING STEP.

In walking together, especially when arm in arm, it is desirable that the two keep step.  Ladies should be particular to adapt their pace as far as practicable, to that of their escort.  It is easily done.

OPENING THE DOOR FOR A LADY.

A gentleman should always hold open the door for a lady to enter first.  This is obligatory, not only in the case of the lady who accompanies him, but also in that of any strange lady who chances to be about to enter at the same time.

ANSWERING QUESTIONS.

A gentleman will answer courteously any questions which a lady may address to him upon the street, at the same time lifting his hat, or at least touching it respectfully.

SMOKING UPON THE STREETS.

In England a well-bred man never smokes upon the streets.  While this rule does not hold good in this country, yet no gentleman will ever insult a lady by smoking in the streets in her company, and in meeting and saluting a lady he will always remove his cigar from his mouth.

OFFENSIVE BEHAVIOR.

No gentleman is ever guilty of the offense of standing on street corners and the steps of hotels or other public places and boldly scrutinizing every lady who passes.

CARRYING PACKAGES.

A gentleman will never permit a lady with whom he is walking to carry a package of any kind, but will insist upon relieving her of it.  He may even accost a lady when he sees her overburdened and offer his assistance, if their ways lie in the same direction.

SHOUTING.

Never speak to your acquaintances from one side of the street to the other.  Shouting is a certain sign of vulgarity.  First approach, and then make your communication to your acquaintance or friend in a moderately loud tone of voice.

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Our Deportment from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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