Our Deportment eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 348 pages of information about Our Deportment.

PROTECTION AGAINST MOTHS.

Dissolve two ounces of camphor in half a pint each of alcohol and spirits of turpentine; keep in a stone bottle and shake before using.  Dip blotting paper in the liquid, and place in the box with the articles to be preserved.

TO TAKE MILDEW OUT OF LINEN.

Wet the linen in soft water, rub it well with white soap, then scrape some fine chalk to powder, and rub it well into the linen; lay it out on the grass in the sunshine, watching to keep it damp with soft water.  Repeat the process the next day, and in a few hours the mildew will entirely disappear.

CURE FOR IN-GROWING NAILS ON TOES.

Take a little tallow and put it into a spoon, and heat it over a lamp until it becomes very hot; then pour it on the sore or granulation.  The effect will be almost magical.  The pain and tenderness will at once be relieved.  The operation causes very little pain if the tallow is perfectly heated.  Perhaps a repetition may be necessary in some cases.

TO REMOVE GREASE-SPOTS FROM WOOLEN CLOTH.

Take one quart of spirits of wine or alcohol, twelve drops of winter green, one gill of beef-gall and six cents’ worth of lavendar.  A little alkanet to color if you wish.  Mix.

TO CLEAN WOOLEN CLOTH.

Take equal parts of spirits hartshorn and ether.  Ox-gall mixed with it makes it better.

TO TAKE INK-SPOTS FROM LINEN.

Take a piece of mould candle of the finest kind, melt it, and dip the spotted part of the linen in the melted tallow:  Then throw the linen into the wash.

TO REMOVE FRUIT-STAINS.

Moisten the parts stained with cold water; then hold it over the smoke of burning brimstone, and the stain will disappear.  This will remove iron mould also.

CLEANING SILVER.

For cleaning silver, either articles of personal wear or those pertaining to the toilet-table or dressing-case, there is nothing better than a spoonful of common whiting, carefully pounded so as to be without lumps, reduced to a paste with gin.

TO REMOVE GREASE SPOTS.

French chalk is useful for removing grease-spots from clothing.  Spots on silk will sometimes yield if a piece of blotting-paper is placed over them and the blade of a knife is heated (not too much) and passed over the paper.

TO REMOVE A TIGHT RING.

When a ring happens to get so tight on a finger that it cannot be removed, a piece of string, well soaped, may be wound tightly round the finger, commencing at the end of the finger and continued until the ring is reached.  Then force the end of the twine between the ring and finger, and as the string is unwound, the ring will be gradually forced off.

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Our Deportment from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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