Our Deportment eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 348 pages of information about Our Deportment.

Scalding water will remove fruit stains.  So also will hartshorn diluted with warm water, but it will be necessary to apply it several times.

Common salt rubbed on fruit stains before they become dry will extract them.

Colored cotton goods that have ink spilled on them, should be soaked in lukewarm sour milk.

TO REMOVE SPOTS OF PITCH OR TAR.

Scrape off all the pitch or tar you can, then saturate the spots with sweet oil or lard; rub it in well, and let it remain in a warm place for an hour.

TO EXTRACT PAINT FROM GARMENTS.

Saturate the spot with spirits of turpentine, let it remain a number of hours, then rub it between the hands; it will crumble away without injury either to the texture or color of any kind of woolen, cotton or silk goods.

TO CLEAN SILKS AND RIBBONS.

Take equal quantities of soft lye-soap, alcohol or gin, and molasses.  Put the silk on a clean table without creasing; rub on the mixture with a flannel cloth.  Rinse the silk well in cold, clear water, and hang it up to dry without wringing.  Iron it before it gets dry, on the wrong side.  Silks and ribbons treated in this way will look very nicely.

Camphene will extract grease and clean ribbons without changing the color of most things.  They should be dried in the open air and ironed when pretty dry.

The water in which pared potatoes have been boiled is very good to wash black silks in; it stiffens and makes them glossy and black.

Soap-suds answer very well.  They should be washed in two suds and not rinsed in clean water.

REMEDY FOR BURNT KID OR LEATHER SHOES.

If a lady has had the misfortune to put her shoes or slippers too near the stove, and thus had them burned, she can make them nearly as good as ever by spreading soft-soap upon them while they are still hot, and then, when they are cold, washing it off.  It softens the leather and prevents it drawing up.

REMEDY FOR CORNS.

Soak the feet for half an hour two or three nights successively in a pretty strong solution of common soda.  The alkali dissolves the indurated cuticle and the corn comes away, leaving a little cavity which, however, soon fills up.

Corns between the toes are generally more painful than others, and are frequently so situated as to be almost inaccessible to the usual remedies.  They may be cured by wetting them several times a day with spirits of ammonia.

INFLAMED EYELIDS.

Take a slice of stale bread, cut as thin as possible, toast both sides well, but do not burn it; when cold soak it in cold water, then put it between a piece of old linen and apply, changing when it gets warm.

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Our Deportment from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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