Our Deportment eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 348 pages of information about Our Deportment.

TO CLEAN KID BOOTS.

Mix a little white of egg and ink in a bottle, so that the composition may be well shaken up when required for use.  Apply to the kid with a piece of sponge and rub dry.  The best thing to rub dry with is the palm of the hand.  When the kid shows symptoms of cracking, rub in a few drops of sweet oil.  The soles and heels should be polished with common blacking.

TO CLEAN PATENT-LEATHER BOOTS.

In cleaning patent-leather boots, first remove all the dirt upon them with a sponge or flannel; then the boot should be rubbed lightly over with a paste consisting of two spoonfuls of cream and one of linseed oil, both of which require to be warmed before being mixed.  Polish with a soft cloth.

TO REMOVE STAINS AND SPOTS FROM SILK.

Boil five ounces of soft water and six ounces of powdered alum for a short time, and pour it into a vessel to cool.  Warm it for use, and wash the stained part with it and leave dry.

Wash the soiled part with ether, and the grease will disappear.

We often find that lemon-juice, vinegar, oil of vitriol and other sharp corrosives, stain dyed garments.  Sometimes, by adding a little pearlash to a soap-lather and passing the silks through these, the faded color will be restored.  Pearlash and warm water will sometimes do alone, but it is the most efficacious to use the soap-lather and pearlash together.

TOOTHACHE PREVENTIVE.

Use flower of sulphur as a tooth powder every night, rubbing the teeth and gums with a rather hard toothbrush.  If done after dinner, too, all the better.  It preserves the teeth and does not communicate any smell whatever to the mouth.

HOW TO WHITEN LINEN.

Stains occasioned by fruit, iron rust and other similar causes may be removed by applying to the parts injured a weak solution of the chloride of lime, the cloth having been previously well washed.  The parts subjected to this operation should be subsequently rinsed in soft, clear, warm water, without soap, and be immediately dried in the sun.

Oxalic acid diluted with water will accomplish the same end.

TO TAKE STAINS OUT OF SILK.

Mix together in a vial two ounces of essence of lemon and one ounce of oil of turpentine.  Grease and other spots in silk must be rubbed gently with a linen rag dipped in the above composition.  To remove acid stains from silks, apply with a soft rag, spirits of ammonia.

TO REMOVE STAINS FROM WHITE COTTON GOODS.

For mildew, rub in salt and some buttermilk, and expose it to the influence of a hot sun.  Chalk and soap or lemon juice and salt are also good.  As fast as the spots become dry, more should be rubbed on, and the garment should be kept in the sun until the spots disappear.  Some one of the preceding things will extract most kinds of stains, but a hot sun is necessary to render any one of them effectual.

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Our Deportment from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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