Our Deportment eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 348 pages of information about Our Deportment.

DYEING THE HAIR.

A serious objection to dyeing the hair is that it is almost impossible to give the hair a tint which harmonizes with the complexion.  If the hair begins to change early, and the color goes in patches, procure from the druggist’s a preparation of the husk of the walnut water of eau crayon.  This will, by daily application, darken the tint of the hair without actually dyeing it.  When the change of color has gone on to any great extent, it is better to abandon the application and put up with the change, which, in nine cases out of ten, will be in accordance with the change of the face.  Indeed, there is nothing more beautiful than soft, white hair worn in bands or clustering curls about the face.  The walnut water may be used for toning down too red hair.

BALDNESS.

Gentlemen are more liable to baldness than ladies, owing, no doubt, to the use of the close hat, which confines and overheats the head.  If the hair is found to be falling out, the first thing to do is to look to the hat and see that it is light and thoroughly ventilated.  There is no greater enemy to the hair than the silk dress-hat.  It is best to lay this hat aside altogether and adopt a light felt or straw in its place.

Long, flowing hair on a man is not in good taste, and will indicate him to the observer as a person of unbalanced mind and unpleasantly erratic character—­a man, in brief, who seeks to impress others with the fact that he is eccentric, something which a really eccentric person never attempts.

THE BEARD.

Those who shave should be careful to do so every morning.  Nothing looks worse than a shabby beard.  Some persons whose beards are strong should shave twice a day, especially if they are going to a party in the evening.

The style of the growth of the beard should be governed by the character of the face.  But whatever the style be, the great point is to keep it well brushed and trimmed, and to avoid any appearance of wildness or inattention.  The full, flowing beard of course requires more looking after in the way of cleanliness, than any other.  It should be thoroughly washed and brushed at least twice a day, as dust is sure to accumulate in it, and it is very easy to suffer it to become objectionable to one’s self as well as to others.  If it is naturally glossy, it is better to avoid the use of oil or pomatum.  The moustache should be worn neatly and not over-large.  There is nothing that so adds to native manliness as the full beard if carefully and neatly kept.

THE HAND.

The beautiful hand is long and slender, with tapering fingers and pink, filbert-shaped nails.  The hand to be in proper proportion to the rest of the body, should be as long as from the point of the chin to the edge of the hair on the forehead.

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Our Deportment from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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