The Adventures of Ann eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 46 pages of information about The Adventures of Ann.

On kept the little slender, erect figure, with the fierce determination in its heart, through the snow and sleet, holding the blanket close over its head, and swinging the feeble lantern bravely.

When she reached the doctor’s house, he was gone.  He had started for the North Precinct early in the evening, his good wife said; he was called down to Captain Isaac Lovejoy’s, the house next the North Precinct Meeting House.  She’d been sitting up waiting for him, it was such an awful storm, and such a lonely road.  She was worried, but she didn’t think he’d start for home that night; she guessed he’d stay at Captain Lovejoy’s till morning.

The doctor’s wife, holding her door open, as best she could, in the violent wind, had hardly given this information to the little snow-bedraggled object standing out there in the inky darkness, through which the lantern made a faint circle of light, before she had disappeared.

“She went like a speerit,” said the good woman, staring out into the blackness in amazement.  She never dreamed of such a thing as Ann’s going to the North Precinct after the doctor, but that was what the daring girl had determined to do.  She had listened to the doctor’s wife in dismay, but with never one doubt as to her own course of proceeding.

Straight along the road to the North Precinct she kept.  It would have been an awful journey that night for a strong man.  It seemed incredible that a little girl could have the strength or courage to accomplish it.  There were four miles to traverse in a black, howling storm, over a pathless road, through forests, with hardly a house by the way.

When she reached Captain Isaac Lovejoy’s house, next to the Meeting House in the North Precinct of Braintree, stumbling blindly into the warm, lighted kitchen, the captain and the doctor could hardly believe their senses.  She told the doctor about Thirsey; then she almost fainted from cold and exhaustion.

Good wife Lovejoy laid her on the settee, and brewed her some hot herb tea.  She almost forgot her own sick little girl, for a few minutes, in trying to restore this brave child who had come from the South Precinct in this dreadful storm to save little Thirsey Wales’ life.

When Ann came to herself a little, her first question was, if the doctor were ready to go.

“He’s gone,” said Mrs. Lovejoy, cheeringly.

Ann felt disappointed.  She had thought she was going back with him.  But that would have been impossible.  She could not have stood the journey for the second time that night, even on horseback behind the doctor, as she had planned.

She drank a second bowlful of herb tea, and went to bed with a hot stone at her feet, and a great many blankets and coverlids over her.

The next morning, Captain Lovejoy carried her home.  He had a rough wood sled, and she rode on that, on an old quilt; it was easier than horseback, and she was pretty lame and tired.

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The Adventures of Ann from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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