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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 427 pages of information about The Return of the Native.

When he drew nearer he perceived it to be a spring van, ordinary in shape, but singular in colour, this being a lurid red.  The driver walked beside it; and, like his van, he was completely red.  One dye of that tincture covered his clothes, the cap upon his head, his boots, his face, and his hands.  He was not temporarily overlaid with the colour; it permeated him.

The old man knew the meaning of this.  The traveller with the cart was a reddleman—­a person whose vocation it was to supply farmers with redding for their sheep.  He was one of a class rapidly becoming extinct in Wessex, filling at present in the rural world the place which, during the last century, the dodo occupied in the world of animals.  He is a curious, interesting, and nearly perished link between obsolete forms of life and those which generally prevail.

The decayed officer, by degrees, came up alongside his fellow-wayfarer, and wished him good evening.  The reddleman turned his head, and replied in sad and occupied tones.  He was young, and his face, if not exactly handsome, approached so near to handsome that nobody would have contradicted an assertion that it really was so in its natural colour.  His eye, which glared so strangely through his stain, was in itself attractive—­keen as that of a bird of prey, and blue as autumn mist.  He had neither whisker nor moustache, which allowed the soft curves of the lower part of his face to be apparent.  His lips were thin, and though, as it seemed, compressed by thought, there was a pleasant twitch at their corners now and then.  He was clothed throughout in a tight-fitting suit of corduroy, excellent in quality, not much worn, and well-chosen for its purpose, but deprived of its original colour by his trade.  It showed to advantage the good shape of his figure.  A certain well-to-do air about the man suggested that he was not poor for his degree.  The natural query of an observer would have been, Why should such a promising being as this have hidden his prepossessing exterior by adopting that singular occupation?

After replying to the old man’s greeting he showed no inclination to continue in talk, although they still walked side by side, for the elder traveller seemed to desire company.  There were no sounds but that of the booming wind upon the stretch of tawny herbage around them, the crackling wheels, the tread of the men, and the footsteps of the two shaggy ponies which drew the van.  They were small, hardy animals, of a breed between Galloway and Exmoor, and were known as “heath-croppers” here.

Now, as they thus pursued their way, the reddleman occasionally left his companion’s side, and, stepping behind the van, looked into its interior through a small window.  The look was always anxious.  He would then return to the old man, who made another remark about the state of the country and so on, to which the reddleman again abstractedly replied, and then again they would lapse into silence.  The silence conveyed to neither any sense of awkwardness; in these lonely places wayfarers, after a first greeting, frequently plod on for miles without speech; contiguity amounts to a tacit conversation where, otherwise than in cities, such contiguity can be put an end to on the merest inclination, and where not to put an end to it is intercourse in itself.

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