The Return of the Native eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 427 pages of information about The Return of the Native.

Eustacia was now no longer the goddess but the woman to him, a being to fight for, support, help, be maligned for.  Now that he had reached a cooler moment he would have preferred a less hasty marriage; but the card was laid, and he determined to abide by the game.  Whether Eustacia was to add one other to the list of those who love too hotly to love long and well, the forthcoming event was certainly a ready way of proving.

VI

Yeobright Goes, and the Breach Is Complete

All that evening smart sounds denoting an active packing up came from Yeobright’s room to the ears of his mother downstairs.

Next morning he departed from the house and again proceeded across the heath.  A long day’s march was before him, his object being to secure a dwelling to which he might take Eustacia when she became his wife.  Such a house, small, secluded, and with its windows boarded up, he had casually observed a month earlier, about two miles beyond the village of East Egdon, and six miles distant altogether; and thither he directed his steps today.

The weather was far different from that of the evening before.  The yellow and vapoury sunset which had wrapped up Eustacia from his parting gaze had presaged change.  It was one of those not infrequent days of an English June which are as wet and boisterous as November.  The cold clouds hastened on in a body, as if painted on a moving slide.  Vapours from other continents arrived upon the wind, which curled and parted round him as he walked on.

At length Clym reached the margin of a fir and beech plantation that had been enclosed from heath land in the year of his birth.  Here the trees, laden heavily with their new and humid leaves, were now suffering more damage than during the highest winds of winter, when the boughs are especially disencumbered to do battle with the storm.  The wet young beeches were undergoing amputations, bruises, cripplings, and harsh lacerations, from which the wasting sap would bleed for many a day to come, and which would leave scars visible till the day of their burning.  Each stem was wrenched at the root, where it moved like a bone in its socket, and at every onset of the gale convulsive sounds came from the branches, as if pain were felt.  In a neighbouring brake a finch was trying to sing; but the wind blew under his feathers till they stood on end, twisted round his little tail, and made him give up his song.

Yet a few yards to Yeobright’s left, on the open heath, how ineffectively gnashed the storm!  Those gusts which tore the trees merely waved the furze and heather in a light caress.  Egdon was made for such times as these.

Yeobright reached the empty house about mid-day.  It was almost as lonely as that of Eustacia’s grandfather, but the fact that it stood near a heath was disguised by a belt of firs which almost enclosed the premises.  He journeyed on about a mile further to the village in which the owner lived, and, returning with him to the house, arrangements were completed, and the man undertook that one room at least should be ready for occupation the next day.  Clym’s intention was to live there alone until Eustacia should join him on their wedding day.

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The Return of the Native from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.