Effie Maurice eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 44 pages of information about Effie Maurice.

’If Mrs Wiston, or any other person, honours wealth more than humble, unaffected piety, she disobeys the first commandment.  But in judging of others, my dear, always remember that you cannot see the heart, and so, however bad the appearance may be, you have a right to put the best possible construction on every action.’

’How can I believe that Mrs Wiston’s heart is any better than her actions, mother?’

’In the first place, Jane might have been mistaken, and money may have nothing to do with her mother’s visits; and if she is really correct, Mrs Wiston may never have considered this properly, and so at least she deserves charity.  I desire you to think a great deal on this subject, and when you understand it better, we will talk more about it.’

’I think I understand it now, mother.  Every thing we love better than the God of heaven becomes our god, and if we don’t bow down to pray to it, we give it our heart-worship, as you said, and that is quite as wicked.  But after all, mother, I don’t think there is any danger of my breaking the first commandment.’

’Do you remember the text Harry repeated at the table this morning?  “Let him that thinketh he standeth, take heed lest he fall."’

Effie looked very thoughtful for a moment, and then laying her face in her mother’s lap, she said:  ’It is not because I am so good that I think so, mother; I know I am very wicked, but I am sure that I love my heavenly Father better than any thing else.’

‘I am glad to believe you do,’ said Mrs Maurice, drawing the child nearer to her and kissing her cheek.  ’I am persuaded that calmly and deliberately you would not prefer the world to Him.  But perpetual distrust of self, with constant trust in God, is your only ground of safety.  Those who do not fall, may for a moment slip, and you with all the rest of us must watch and pray.’

CHAPTER II.

Plans proposed.

The conversation that Effie Maurice had had with her mother made a very deep impression on her mind; but still, with all the confidence of one who has had but few trials, she was grieved that any one should suppose she could for a moment forget her heavenly Father, or prefer any thing to His glory and honour.  She repeated what her mother had said to her brother Harry, and he increased her self-confidence by recalling a great many little sacrifices she had made, which he was quite sure other young persons would not do.

‘And now, Effie,’ said the kind-hearted brother, ’we will talk no more about this, for it makes you very sober.  Remember that to-morrow is New Year’s day, and we’ve got the money to spend that Aunt Norton sent us, so we must be out early, or all the prettiest things will be sold.  I went by Mr T.’s shop to-night, and it was all lighted up so that I could see great sticks of candy, almost as big round as my wrist, and jars of

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Effie Maurice from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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