Great Violinists And Pianists eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 224 pages of information about Great Violinists And Pianists.

THE SCHUMANNS AND CHOPIN.

Robert Schumann’s Place as a National Composer.—­Peculiar Greatness as a Piano-forte Composer.—­Born at Zwickau in 1810.—­His Father’s Aversion to his Musical Studies.—­Becomes a Student of Jurisprudence in Leipzig.—­Makes the Acquaintance of Clara Wieck.—­Tedium of his Law Studies.—­Vacation Tour to Italy.—­Death of his Father, and Consent of his Mother to Schumann adopting the Profession of Music.—­Becomes Wieck’s Pupil.—­Injury to his Hand which prevents all Possibilities of his becoming a Great Performer.—­Devotes himself to Composition.—­The Child, Clara Wieck—­Remarkable Genius as a Player.—­Her Early Training.—­Paganini’s Delight in her Genius.—­Clara Wieck’s Concert Tours.—­Schumann falls deeply in Love with her, and Wieck’s Opposition.—­His Allusions to Clara in the “Neue Zeit-schrift.”—­Schumann at Vienna.—­His Compositions at first Unpopular, though played by Clara Wieck and Liszt.—­Schumann’s Labors as a Critic.—­He marries Clara in 1840.—­His Song Period inspired by his Wife.—­Tour to Russia, and Brilliant Reception given to the Artist Pair.—­The “Neue Zeitschrift” and its Mission.—­The Davidsbund.—­Peculiar Style of Schumann’s Writing.—­He moves to Dresden.—­Active Production in Orchestral Composition.—­Artistic Tour in Holland.—­He is seized with Brain Disease.—­Characteristics as a Man, as an Artist, and as a Philosopher.—­Mme. Schumann as her Husband’s Interpreter.—­Chopin a Colaborer with Schumann.—­Schumann on Chopin again.—­Chopin’s Nativity.—­Exclusively a Piano-forte Composer.—­His Genre as Pianist and Composer.—­Aversion to Concert-giving.—­Parisian Associations.—­New Style of Technique demanded by his Works.—­Unique Treatment of the Instrument.—­Characteristics of Chopin’s Compositions.

THALBERG AND GOTTSCHALK.

Thalberg one of the Greatest of Executants.—­Rather a Man of Remarkable Talents than of Genius.—­Moseheles’s Description of him.—­The Illegitimate Son of an Austrian Prince.—­Early Introduction to Musical Society in London and Vienna.—­Beginning of his Career as a Virtuoso.—­The Brilliancy of his Career.—­Is appointed Court Pianist to the Emperor of Austria.—­His Marriage.—­Visits to America.—­Thalberg’s Artistic Idiosyncrasy.—­Robert Schumann on his Playing.—­His Appearance and Manner.—­Characterization by George William Curtis.—­Thalberg’s Style and Worth as an Artist.—­His Piano-forte Method, and Place as a Composer for the Piano.—­Gottschalk’s Birth and Early Years.—­He is sent to Paris for Instruction.—­Successful Debut and Publie Concerts in Paris and Tour through the French Cities.—­Friendship with Berlioz.—­Concert Tour to Spain.—­Romantic Experiences.—­Berlioz on Gottschalk.—­Reception of Gottschalk in America.—­Criticism of his Style.—­Remarkable Success of his Concerts.—­His Visit to the West Indies, Mexico, and Central America.—­Protracted Absence.—­Gottschalk on Life in the Tropics.—­Return to the United States.—­Three Brilliant Musical Years.—­Departure for South America.—­Triumphant Procession through the Spanish-American Cities.—­Death at Rio Janeiro.—­Notes on Gottschalk as Man and Artist.

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Great Violinists And Pianists from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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