The Great German Composers eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 143 pages of information about The Great German Composers.
this be all thy sins forgiven thee.”  The penny-a-liners wrote that “words were wanting to express the exquisite delight,” etc.  And—­supreme compliment of all, for Handel was a cynical bachelor—­the fine ladies consented to leave their hoops at home for the second performance, that a couple of hundred or so extra listeners might be accommodated.  This event was the grand triumph of Handel’s life.  Years of misconception, neglect, and rivalry were swept out of mind in the intoxicating delight of that night’s success.

VII.

Handel returned to London, and composed a new oratorio, “Samson,” for the following Lenten season.  This, together with the “Messiah,” heard for the first time in London, made the stock of twelve performances.  The fashionable world ignored him altogether; the newspapers kept a contemptuous silence; comic singers were hired to parody his noblest airs at the great houses; and impudent Horace Walpole had the audacity to say that he “had hired all the goddesses from farces and singers of roast-beef, from between the acts of both theatres, with a man with one note in his voice, and a girl with never a one; and so they sang and made brave hallelujahs.”

The new field into which Handel had entered inspired his genius to its greatest energy.  His new works for the season of 1744 were the “Det-tingen Te Deum,” “Semele,” and “Joseph and his Brethren;” for the next year (he had again rented the Haymarket Theatre), “Hercules,” “Belshazzar,” and a revival of “Deborah.”  All these works were produced in a style of then uncommon completeness, and the great expense he incurred, combined with the active hostility of the fashionable world, forced him to close his doors and suspend payment.  From this time forward Handel gave concerts whenever he chose, and depended on the people, who so supported him by their gradually growing appreciation, that in two years he had paid off all his debts, and in ten years had accumulated a fortune of L10,000.  The works produced during these latter years were “Judas Maccabaeus,” 1747; “Alexander,” 1748; “Joshua,” 1748; “Susannah,” 1749; “Solomon,” 1749; “Theodora,” 1750; “Choice of Hercules,” 1751; “Jephthah,” 1752, closing with this a stupendous series of dramatic oratorios.  While at work on the last, his eyes suffered an attack which finally resulted in blindness.

Like Milton in the case of “Paradise Lost,” Handel preferred one of his least popular oratorios, “Theodora.”  It was a great favorite with him, and he used to say that the chorus, “He saw the lovely youth,” was finer than anything in the “Messiah.”  The public were not of this opinion, and he was glad to give away tickets to any professors who applied for them.  When the “Messiah” was again produced, two of these gentlemen who had neglected “Theodora” applied for admission.  “Oh! your sarvant, meine Herren!” exclaimed the indignant composer.  “You are tamnable dainty!  You would not

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The Great German Composers from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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