The Part Borne by the Dutch in the Discovery of Australia 1606-1765 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 186 pages of information about The Part Borne by the Dutch in the Discovery of Australia 1606-1765.

About a mile more or less off shore, there is as a rule a rocky reef, on which the breakers may be seen to dash violently in many places, the depth above the reef being in several places, 1, 11/2 and even 2 fathom, so that pinnaces and boats may get over it for the purpose of landing, there being deeper water close inshore, but all of it with a rocky, sharp coral-bottom, so that it is difficult to land there, and much harder still to keep a pinnace at anchor with a drag; except in a place about 9 miles north of the island, where there are three rocks close to the shore, which are connected by a rocky reef, behind which you may conveniently lie at anchor and effect a landing with pinnaces or boats; but the bottom is foul and rocky everywhere.

Inward, the land is pretty high, with hills of even height, but barren and wild to look at, except near the island where a great many trees are seen.

In slightly under 32 deg.  S. Lat. there is a large island, at about 3 miles’ distance from the mainland of the South-land; this island has high mountains, with a good deal of brushwood and many thornbushes, so that it is hard to go over; here certain animals are found, since we saw many excrements, and besides two seals and a wild cat, resembling a civet-cat, but with browner hair.  This island is dangerous to touch at, owing to the rocky reefs which are level with the water and below the surface, almost along the whole length of the shore; between it and the mainland there are also numerous rocks and reefs, and slightly more to southward there is another small island.

This large island to which we have been unwilling to give a name, leaving this matter to the Honourable Lord Governor-General’s pleasure, may be seen at 7 or 8 miles’ distance out at sea in fine weather.  I surmise that brackish or fresh water might be obtainable there, and likewise good firewood, but not without great trouble.

Two good and certain landmarks of the West-coast of the Southland: 

Firstly:  If in these regions you observe about 11 degrees variation of the compass, you may be sure of not being at more than 18 or 20 miles’ distance from the land.

Secondly:  If you see rock-weed floating about, you may be assured that you will sound the bottom in 70, 60, 50, 40, 30 fathom or less.

At foot: 

Your obedient Servant
(signed)
SAMUEL VOLCKERSEN.

H.

Daily Journal kept by Skipper AUCKE PIETERS JONCK, skipper of the galiot Emeloordt, on her voyage from Battavia to the South-land, A.D. 1658 [*]

[* See preceding note.]

{Page 80}

I.

Chart of Eendrachisland, 1658

[Map No. 10.  Kaart van (Chart of) Eendrachtsland, 1658]

* * * * *

{Page 81}

XXX.

(1658).  THE SHIP ELBURG, COMMANDED BY JACOB PIETERSZOON PEEREBOOM, TOUCHES AT THE SOUTH-WEST COAST OF AUSTRALIA AND AT CAPE LEEUWIN, ON HER VOYAGE FROM THE NETHERLANDS TO BATAVIA [*].

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The Part Borne by the Dutch in the Discovery of Australia 1606-1765 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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