The German Element in Brazil eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 40 pages of information about The German Element in Brazil.
Brazilian    Brazilian
Portuguese.  German.     English.

     canoa f.... kanoe n... monoxylon, dugout.
     farinha f.. farin n... flour.

From the above examples it will be observed that the gender of the Brazilian German noun is, where there has been a change from that of the original Brazilian Portuguese, as a rule, the same as that of the High German word replaced, e.g.,

     Brazilian German. High German.

barranke f.........   Boeschung_f._
cachass m..........   Schnaps m.
camarote f.........   Theaterloge f.
charute f..........   Zigarre f.
doss n.............   Konfekt n.
farelle f..........   Kleie f.
farin n............   Mehl n.
fosforon n.........   Streichholz_n._
kaschimbe f........   Tabakspfeife f.
portreere f........   Weide m.
troc m.............   Wechsel m.

D. Nouns of mixed origin are quite frequent, e.g.,

     Brazilian German. English.

aboboramus...........  stewed (and mashed) pumpkin.
korbgarrafao.........  demijohn.
miljekolben..........  cob (of corn).
mesclahosen..........  trousers (striped).
ochsencarrete........  ox-cart
palhazigarrette......  cigarette (with cornhusk wrapper).
polizeidelegado......  inspector of police.
puschochse...........  draught-ox.
rocewirtschaft.......  agriculture, farming.
sellofiskal..........  revenue agent.
vendaschuld..........  drinking-score, debt for drink.

II.  Verbs.

Brazilian German verbs are commonly formed by adding a weak ending, ’-en’ or ’-ieren’ to the Portuguese stem, e.g.,

     Portuguese. Brazilian German. English.

amolar.........  amolieren..........  to grind, sharpen.
capinar........  capinen............  to weed.
cobrar.........  cobrieren..........  to cash, take in (money),
lacar .........  lassen.............  to throw the lasso.
puxar..........  puschen, pussen....  to pull.
repousar.......  posen..............  to rest.
requerer.......  rekerieren.........  to request.
rocar..........  rossieren..........  to clear of weeds.
sellar.........  sellieren..........  to stamp.
tocar..........  tocken.............  to beat, strike.
trocar.........  trocken............  to change (money etc.).

In pronunciation the Brazilian German differs still more from the Portuguese than the printed forms would indicate.  The main additional differences in this case are the following: 

1) The noun ending ’_-ao’_ has the value of ’-ong’ instead of the Portuguese sound represented by ’-ao.’ Thus, by phonetic spelling we would have, e.g.,

     Brazilian German. Portuguese.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The German Element in Brazil from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook