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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 388 pages of information about The Odyssey.

Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor’s youngest daughter, washed Telemachus.  When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, she brought him a fair mantle and shirt, {33} and he looked like a god as he came from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor.  When the outer meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down to dinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who kept pouring them out their wine in cups of gold.  As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink Nestor said, “Sons, put Telemachus’s horses to the chariot that he may start at once.”

Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said, and yoked the fleet horses to the chariot.  The housekeeper packed them up a provision of bread, wine, and sweet meats fit for the sons of princes.  Then Telemachus got into the chariot, while Pisistratus gathered up the reins and took his seat beside him.  He lashed the horses on and they flew forward nothing loth into the open country, leaving the high citadel of Pylos behind them.  All that day did they travel, swaying the yoke upon their necks till the sun went down and darkness was over all the land.  Then they reached Pherae where Diocles lived, who was son to Ortilochus and grandson to Alpheus.  Here they passed the night and Diocles entertained them hospitably.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, they again yoked their horses and drove out through the gateway under the echoing gatehouse. {34} Pisistratus lashed the horses on and they flew forward nothing loth; presently they came to the corn lands of the open country, and in the course of time completed their journey, so well did their steeds take them. {35}

Now when the sun had set and darkness was over the land,

Book IV

The visit to king Menelaus, who tells his story—­meanwhile the suitors in Ithaca plot against telemachus.

they reached the low lying city of Lacedaemon, where they drove straight to the abode of Menelaus {36} [and found him in his own house, feasting with his many clansmen in honour of the wedding of his son, and also of his daughter, whom he was marrying to the son of that valiant warrior Achilles.  He had given his consent and promised her to him while he was still at Troy, and now the gods were bringing the marriage about; so he was sending her with chariots and horses to the city of the Myrmidons over whom Achilles’ son was reigning.  For his only son he had found a bride from Sparta, {37} the daughter of Alector.  This son, Megapenthes, was born to him of a bondwoman, for heaven vouchsafed Helen no more children after she had borne Hermione, who was fair as golden Venus herself.

So the neighbours and kinsmen of Menelaus were feasting and making merry in his house.  There was a bard also to sing to them and play his lyre, while two tumblers went about performing in the midst of them when the man struck up with his tune.] {38}

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