Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,359 pages of information about Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete.

Mr. Brown’s career advances prosperously; he makes love in the dark to his supposed cousin pro Snoxall, in the hearing of the supposed wife (for the real Selbourne has been married privately) and his supposed friend, both supposing him false, mightily abuse him, all being still in the dark.  At length the real Selbourne enters, and all supposition ends, as does the farce, poetical justice being administered upon the captain by courtesy, by the bailiffs who arrest him.  Thus he, at last, becomes really Mr. Dunne Brown.

The farce was successful, for the actors were perfect, and the audience good-humoured.  We need hardly say who played the hero; and having named Wrench, as the nephew, who was much as usual, everybody will know how.  Mr. David Rees is well adapted for Snoxall, being a good figure for the part, especially in the duck-and-green-peas season.  The ladies, of whom there were four, performed as ladies generally do in farces on a first night.

We recommend the readers of PUNCH to cultivate the acquaintance of “My Friend the Captain.”  They will find him at home every evening at the Haymarket.  We suspect his paternity may be traced to a certain corner, from whose merit several equally successful broad-pieces have been issued.

* * * * *

LITERARY QUERIES AND REPLIES

BY DISTINGUISHED PERSONAGES.

QUESTION BY SIR EDWARD LYTTON BULWER, BART,

“What romance is that which outght to be most admired in the kitchen?”

ANSWER BY THEODORE HOOK.

“Don Quixote; because it was written by Cervantes—­(servantes).—­Rather low, Sir Ned.”

QUESTION BY LADY BLESSINGTON,

“When is a lady’s neck not a neck?”

ANSWER BY LADY MORGAN.

“For shame now!—­When it is a little bare (bear), I suppose.”

* * * * *

A SPEECH FROM THE HUSTINGS.

The following is a correct report of a speech made by one of the candidates at a recent election in the north of England.

THOMAS SMITH, Esq., then presented himself, and said—­” * * * * * * * * crisis * * * * * * * * * * * * * important dreadful * * * * * industry * * * * * * enemies * * slaves * * independence * * * * * * freedom * * * * * firmly * * * * gloriously * * * * contested * * * * * * support * * * * victory, Hurrah!——­”

Mr. Smith then sat down; but we regret that the uproar which prevailed, prevents us giving a fuller report of his very eloquent and impressive speech.

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Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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